I've got cramp in my legs...

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Masood

Senior Member
British English
How would you say "I've got cramp in my legs" I.e. Muscle contraction due to excessive exercise.

Tengo contractura muscular en las piernas. (?)

Thanks
 
  • Valeria Mesalina

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    How would you say "I've got cramp in my legs" I.e. Muscle contraction due to excessive exercise.

    Tengo una contractura muscular en las piernas. (?)
    España en general: es correcto, y es probablemente lo que nos diría un médico: "no se ha roto usted la pierna; lo que usted tiene es una contractura muscular". Si corremos demasiado normalmente decimos "tengo que parar de correr, me ha dado un calambre", como ha dicho Blasita.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    How would you say "I've got cramp in my legs" I.e. Muscle contraction due to excessive exercise.
    Masood, would you really say "I've got cramp" instead of "I've got a cramp"? Or was that just a typo?

    I agree with blasita as far as the translation:
    Me dio calambre en las piernas.
    Me dio un calambre en la pierna.

    I've heard it with and without the article.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Masood, would you really say "I've got cramp" instead of "I've got a cramp"? Or was that just a typo?
    I would not be able to have a cramp in my legs. If both legs are involved, that would be cramps in my legs.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    Thanks for the confirmation. Perhaps it's a BE/AE distinction. In American English, you can have a cramp, or cramps, or the cramps. But you can't just have 'cramp'.

    I'm not sure what the standard is in Spanish, and whether all Spanish-speakers would be OK with me dio calambre, without the article.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    I'm not sure what the standard is in Spanish, and whether all Spanish-speakers would be OK with me dio calambre, without the article.
    In Spain, we use: Me ha dado/Me dio un calambre in these cases. Or, for example: Me dan muchos calambres (plural). If you say Me dio calambre (without the article), I'd understand you got an electric shock (talking about electrical equipment).
     

    Rubns

    Senior Member
    Español - Spanish (Spain)
    I wouldn't say it's a regionalism, it's used over here too (at least, where I live), but it's not as common as "me ha dado un calambre".

    Cheers.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    I had no idea that acalambrarse was a regionalism. Good to know!
    No, apparently it's used in all (?) LAm. DRAE:
    acalambrar.1.tr. Am. Contraer los músculos a causa del calambre. U. t. c. prnl.
    I wouldn't say it's a regionalism, it's used over here too (at least, where I live), but it's not as common as "me ha dado un calambre".
    This comes as a big surprise to me, Rubns. Good to know, thank you. I would understand it in context, but this is a new term for me. And I dare say acalambrar is not even known in most parts of Spain.
     

    Rubns

    Senior Member
    Español - Spanish (Spain)
    Just to put you in context, for example my father goes jogging every now and then, and sometimes when he gets home says: traigo las piernas acalambradas (with an Extremaduran accent: traigo lah piernah acalambráh). I've never heard "se me acalambran las piernas" though, only in its participle form. I guess it might be a regionalism within Spain.

    Cheers!
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    Masood, would you really say "I've got cramp" instead of "I've got a cramp"? Or was that just a typo?
    Another Brit to confirm that I would use "cramp" as uncountable.
    Also, usually (for me, at least): "I've got earache", "I've got stomach ache"
    BUT always (for me): "I've got a headache".
    Please don't ask me about the logic of that!

    EDIT: Apologies for going even further off the topic, but I wrote the above instinctively and then checked it out. Just another peculiarity of English here:http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1882088
     
    Last edited:

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    El uso de "acalambrar" que comentaba Rubns me pareció muy interesante por las razones que ya di. Antes de escribir mi último mensaje había preguntado a varios españoles de un par de regiones distintas a la mía (Madrid), pero me quedé con las ganas de saber más. En fin, que pensé que le faltaban usos a este hilo y decidí abrir una conversación en el Solo Español. Espero que sea útil a muchos foreros: acalambrar(se). (Es muy posible que vengan más aportes, así que recomiendo suscribirse a este hilo).
     
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