I've got it.

Brigitte_anna

Senior Member
Russian
Context: Someone is explaining me something. But I know it already, I have known it before.

May I say "Thank you, but I've got it already"?

I've got = I have. I have the knowledge you are explaining me.
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You can say Thank you but I already knew that.

    I wouldn't say Thank you, but I've got it already - for one thing, I don't think the tense is right, because "already" here refers to a past event.
     

    Brigitte_anna

    Senior Member
    Russian
    You can say Thank you but I already knew that.

    I wouldn't say Thank you, but I've got it already - for one thing, I don't think the tense is right, because "already" here refers to a past event.
    already means before or by now. So it can be used with the present perfect, right?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Already' is commonly used with the present perfect when the present perfect is the indicated verb form for the context.

    In the OP
    But I know it already, I knew have known it before.
    Here 'before' refers to a non-specified period or even point of time in the past when you were taught the idea or had it explained to you, a time when you learnt and you understood. It was in the past and that idea of completed past ('perfect') holds good even though you have not lost that understanding.
    (A better question might be, "When is the present perfect used with 'before'?")

    To use the present perfect we need a context which in some way relates past to present. This is especially true in British-English: American-English seems to be more tolerant of using the simple past, at least in some contexts.

    - Would you please finish the report by tomorrow.
    - I've already finished it.

    - I'd like an omelette,please. Let me explain to you how to make a good omelette.
    - I already know 'how to make a good omelette'. Thanks all the same.
    - Are you quite sure?
    - Yes, I am. I was taught how to make omelettes in the kitchen of Paul Bocuse in Lyons in 1978, so by 1979 I already knew all about how to make all sorts of omelettes. By then, I must have already made hundreds. That means I have known how to make omelettes since 1978. In other words, I have known how to produce perfect omelettes for forty years. I think that means I knew how to make omelettes before you were born, sir.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Context: Someone is explaining me something. But I know it already, I have known it before.

    May I say "Thank you, but I've got it already"?

    I've got = I have. I have the knowledge you are explaining me.
    No. For one thing, when "I've got" means something like "I have", the meaning is like a present simple, and has nothing to do with getting anything. For another thing, the idiom "I've got it" means "I understand", not "I have the knowledge".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top