I've heard of people keeping their batteries in the fridge.

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Apophis

Senior Member
Portuguese
I've heard of people keeping their batteries in the fridge.


Hi,
This verb seems a little tricky sometimes.
Can I use it this way?
Should I use "store"?
Thanks.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    "Keeping" works fine for me, an American English speaker. "Storing" is a little more formal and would work in written papers or articles. "Keeping" is very common in everyday conversation.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is perfectly normal in BE as well. Perhaps you could explain why it seems tricky to you?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Your sentence is fine with keep.

    You could also use store. "Store" suggests to me that they have a supply of batteries, and that they store them over a length of time. "Keep" is a less suggestive term (to me). It simply tells me that they put their batteries in the fridge, and that's where you'll find them. In this case, the difference isn't really significant.

    Edit: As usual, I was slow, and two responses above were posted while I was writing this.
     

    Apophis

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    It is perfectly normal in BE as well. Perhaps you could explain why it seems tricky to you?
    I don't remember exactly why I'm suspicious about "keep".
    Sometimes I think I can use a verb in a certain way, and I can't.
    The other day I used "maintain" and a native speaker couldn't understand me.
    The context:
    There is a machine.
    In this machine, there is the part "A".
    The guy makes a change in the machine and part "A" seems to me not to be necessary anymore.
    Then I ask him "why did you maintain part A" and he doesn't understand me.
    He replies me "are you asking me why do I have to have part A?".
    "Maintain" and Portuguese "manter' look similar and mean exactly the same, but just in the dictionary, I think.
    Is this case, could I have used "keep"?
    Thanks.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The guy makes a change in the machine and part "A" seems to me not to be necessary anymore.
    Then I ask him "why did you maintain part A" and he doesn't understand me.

    Is this case, could I have used "keep"?
    Yes, keep is the right word here as well.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, indeed, you could use keep. You would be understood to be asking, "Why do you have it here instead of getting rid of it." We would understand "Why do you maintain ...?" to be asking "Why do you repair this and do what is necessary to keep it in good working order?" (I tried to avoid using keep here, but couldn't.)

    Your post looked like it was going off-topic, but then you brought it around to your original question. Nicely done. :thumbsup: ;).
     
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