I've just been to see the movie

Hiden

Senior Member
japanese
Can I use “I’ve just been to see the movie” to express “gone away and returned”?:

“I’ve just been to see the new Ultraman movie. They used the same musical score as the old one. The movie was really good, but it couldn't beat the original.”
 
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  • Hiden

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Could you let me see if I understand the expression correctly? (1) can be used to express the same meaning as (2), right?

    (1) I've just been to see the latest ‘Ultraman’ movie.
    (2) I just got back from seeing the latest ‘Ultraman’ movie.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It will depend on where the speaker is when they say 1).
    In 2) the inclusion of back will lead us to assume a context such as "I'm back at home*"
    *or another location if the listener knows where the speaker left from (such as a hotel room if the conversation is on the telephone).
    Context, context, context
     

    Hiden

    Senior Member
    japanese
    It will depend on where the speaker is when they say 1).
    In 2) the inclusion of back will lead us to assume a context such as "I'm back at home*"
    *or another location if the listener knows where the speaker left from (such as a hotel room if the conversation is on the telephone).
    Context, context, context
    Thank you. If the speaker is back at home, are they interchangeable?
     

    homotopy07

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    It's fine, but there are simpler ways, like "I just saw the new Ultraman." UK usage may be different.

    Does "I’ve just been to see the new Ultraman" sound like British English to you?

    I think that AE speakers sometimes use the simple past when BE speakers use the present perfect.

    (a) She just went out.
    (b) She's just gone out.

    [In a dining room.]
    (c) My mon said to me, "Did you wash your hands?"
    (d) My mum said to me, 'Have you washed your hands?'
     
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    Hiden

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Does "I’ve just been to see the new Ultraman" sound British English to you?
    I asked one of my friends from the U.S.

    Q. (Hide)
    Can (1) be used to express the same meaning as (2)?

    (1) I've just been to see the latest ‘Ultraman’ movie.
    (2) I just got back from seeing the latest ‘Ultraman’ movie.

    Ans: (Jill S)
    Yes, those have the same meaning. (1) sounds more formal, and sort of British rather than American, if that makes any sense.

    I hope The Newt-san will answer your question.
     
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    Hiden

    Senior Member
    japanese
    It's fine, but there are simpler ways, like "I just saw the new Ultraman." UK usage may be different.
    I’ m thinking that “I’ve been to see the latest ‘Ultraman’ movie” conveys the idea that the speaker went somewhere to see it (probably a movie theatre) and have just returned. However, “I just saw/I ’ve just seen the latest Ultraman movie” does not convey the idea that the speaker went somewhere and returned after seeing it: it merely focuses on the action of seeing the movie- maybe at the cinema.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I’ m thinking that “I’ve been to see the latest ‘Ultraman’ movie” conveys the idea that the speaker went somewhere to see it (probably a movie theatre) and have just returned. However, “I just saw/I ’ve just seen the latest Ultraman movie” does not convey the idea that the speaker went somewhere and returned after seeing it: it merely focuses on the action of seeing the movie- maybe at the cinema.
    Yes, "been to" implies going somewhere to see it and returning. The "I just saw" does not have that implication - the speaker could have streamed it in the comfort of their own home.
     
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    Forero

    Senior Member
    Does "I’ve just been to see the new Ultraman" sound like British English to you?

    I think that AE speakers sometimes use the simple past when BE speakers use the present perfect.
    That does not apply to "have been to" since there is no simple past form of it. "Been to" with this meaning is defective, having only the past participle form. It does not exist in simple present or past, infinitive, gerund, or present participle form.

    The meaning is usually "gone to … and returned".

    "I was just to see the new Ultraman" may make sense, but "was to" never means anything like "been to", and "was to" is also defective, but a different way, existing only in simple present and simple past, indicative forms only.
     
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