Jambed or jammed?

Forero

Senior Member
Yes. Stuck or jambed (or just obstreperous.)
I thought jamb was just the name of part of a door, so I looked it up. My dictionary seems to say that jamb (v.i.) means "to become unworkable, as through the wedging or displacement of a part", but jam (v.i.) could mean jamb or it could also mean "to become stuck, wedged, fixed, blocked, etc."

Is a jambed lock really more permanent than a merely jammed one?
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This thread began in:
    malfunctioning

    Like Forero, I thought jamb was an architectural term, so I looked it up too :)
    The OED does not list jamb as a verb, but under jam (verb) it lists jamb as an alternative spelling from the 19th and early 20th centuries.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    My Webster's 3rd lists "Jamb" as a var. of "Jam".

    I used "jamb" because "Jam" goes on a peanut butter sandwich, and I like to keep these things separate.

    (The fact of the matter is I have always spelled it like this and I never gave it a minute's thought. Jam = preserves; Jamb = stuck.)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I used "jamb" because "Jam" goes on a peanut butter sandwich, and I like to keep these things separate.
    I've never put a verb on a peanut butter sandwich, and limit my use of jamb to doors. When my kids were small, I sometimes cleaned jam off jambs. My dictionaries show jamb as an obsolete variant of jam, as a verb.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It appears that I am in the minority. My Websters 3rd does, indeed, list this as a variation of "jam". The list: jamb, jambed, jambing.

    But I go on line and I only find: http://dict.die.net/jamb/
    to support that spelling.

    I don't subscribe to OED, and maybe someone could look it up in there.

    (And my spell checker has no issues with it either.)
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    The fact is that I didn't find this meaning in any dictionaries that I've checked (but they are listed as homophones - and that made me think at first that it was a typo).

    It was apparently also used like this:
    2. (Mining) Any thick mass of rock which prevents miners from following the lode or vein. (Webster, 1913)

    Now, my question is, can you really still use the word "jamb" in this context? Is it understood? (In writing, I mean, since they're pronounced the same:D)

    (And can one really eat jam on peanut butter? :eek::p)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The fact is that I didn't find this meaning in any dictionaries that I've checked (but they are listed as homophones - and that made me think at first that it was a typo).

    It was apparently also used like this:
    2. (Mining) Any thick mass of rock which prevents miners from following the lode or vein. (Webster, 1913)

    Now, my question is, can you really still use the word "jamb" in this context? Is it understood? (In writing, i mean, since they're pronounced the same:D)

    (And can one really eat jam on peanut butter? :eek::p)
    When I speak, my spelling is always perfect.

    If Webster's 3rd International accepts the spelling, I generally will too. It is my reference of choice. It does list it as an "also", and not as the primary spelling.
     
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