Jane gave these books to Bill -> What Jane gave to Bill were these books [pseudo-clefting]

Theoi2i

New Member
Romanian
Can someone explain what is Pseudo-coordination and Pseudo-clefting? I'm unable to understand these two. How to identify them and to write them
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Those are not commonly used terms, and they aren't in the index of my big grammar book. Can you give us an example of each? (If you haven't got any examples, obviously they're not important and you don't need to learn about them.)
     

    Theoi2i

    New Member
    Romanian
    Those are not commonly used terms, and they aren't in the index of my big grammar book. Can you give us an example of each? (If you haven't got any examples, obviously they're not important and you don't need to learn about them.)
    I only have this example of pseudo clefting... but it still doesn't make sense to me :/
     

    Attachments

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Moderator Note

    In order to have a focussed, productive discussion, can I please ask that any replies centre on the specific example provided by Theoi2i:
    Jane gave these books to Bill -> What Jane gave to Bill were these books.

    Thank you. DonnyB - moderator
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It doesn't take much searching to find a definition. Here's one: Pseudo-Cleft Sentence

    I'm not sure how useful it is to distinguish a so-called pseudo-cleft from just any old cleft, but they categorize as pseudo- those that involve a relative clause with an interrogative relative pronoun like who/how/what etc.

    The point being made in the attached example is that in converting the simple equivalent ("Jane gave these books to Bill") into pseudo-cleft form, the whole component ("these books" and not just "these") must appear in the cleft as a unit ("What Jane gave (to) Bill were these books"). That's why they've marked the other version, where the component has been split ("What books Jane gave (to) Bill were these") as incorrect (hence the asterisk).

    It's confusing that (and unclear why) they have crossed out the occurrences of "these books" and "these". It seems to be merely for the purpose of identifying things that correspond between the upper (simple) and lower (cleft) versions, and not to indicate incorrectness.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top