Japanese R vs English L and D

vintage_d3vil

Member
American English
Hi. I noticed that these three sounds are very similar. However, I can't seem to make the Japanese r sound correctly. I know the difference between these three sounds. I can even hear the difference. However, I can't seem to replicate the Japanese r sound. Any tips? Thank you so much! ><
 
  • karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    Hi,
    To pronounce らりるれろ, you roll and tap the tip of your tongue at around the root of the front teeth.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I think I know how to distinguish to pronounce Japanese R sound from English D(T) sound.

    When you make D or T sound, your tongue attaches to the upper jaw just near the root of the front teeth, right?

    If you make your tongue attach to one-inch-backward of the upper jaw from where you create D(T) sound, you will pronounce Japanese R.
    (In order to attach to that position, your tongue have to become rolled up a little.)
    (Furthermore, when you pronounce D, the upper side near the edge of your tongue is attached to the jaw. Whereas, when you pronounce Japanese R, the reverse/under side near the edge of your tongue is attached to the jaw.)

    Just try it! :)
     
    Last edited:

    frequency

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi. That's the spot I it for my D. Thus, I ended up making the D sound. How do I make it more like the Japanese r sound. I can't get that rolling effect.
    If you make your tongue attach to one-inch-backward of the upper jaw from where you create D(T) sound, you will pronounce Japanese R. (In order to attach to that position, your tongue have to become rolled up a little.)
    (Furthermore, when you pronounce D, the upper side near the edge of your tongue is attached to the jaw. Whereas, when you pronounce Japanese R, the reverse/under side near the edge of your tongue is attached to the jaw.)

    Agree! A much smaller part of the tip of your tongue touches your upper jaw―almost the edge of it, yes.
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    Hi. That's the spot I it for my D. Thus, I ended up making the D sound. How do I make it more like the Japanese r sound. I can't get that rolling effect.
    I think it's closer to L. If you pronounce Lah, Lih, Lo(o), La(y), Lo(w), you are close enough, but try flipping the tip of your tongue at the palate wherever you feel comfortable.
     
    Last edited:

    vintage_d3vil

    Member
    American English
    I think I know how to distinguish to pronounce Japanese R sound from English D(T) sound.

    (Furthermore, when you pronounce D, the upper side near the edge of your tongue is attached to the jaw. Whereas, when you pronounce Japanese R, the reverse/under side near the edge of your tongue is attached to the jaw.)

    Just try it! :)
    Yes, that is where I make my D; near the root of my front teeth. Can you elaborate not eh quote above. I don't think I understand your explanation. :) In addition, for karlalou, I actually do think the Japanese r sounds a lot more closer to the L. I find my success making the japanese r sound by treating it like an L. However, my successes are not consistent and my pronunciation is not exactly right as well.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Yes, that is where I make my D; near the root of my front teeth.
    "Near the root of my front teeth" is the wrong place.
    "One-inch-backward from the root of my front teeth" is correct.

    When you make D, you make the top of the tongue and the upper jaw near the root of the front teeth contact each other in a very short time, and then you make them apart, creating the explosive sound.
    Here, "upper jaw" means "maxila" or "supramaxilla" as medical terms.

    In order to make Japanese R, you have to make the top of the tongue contact to the posterior supramaxilla, near the uvula.
    ("Near the uvula" is an exaggeration. The distance between the root of your front teeth and your uvula is about two inches, right? So, "one-inch-backward from the root of the front teeth" means the center of the supramailla.)
    Anyway you should try to touch the supramaxilla as backward as possible with your tonge. This is the knack.

    Furthermore, I recommend you to change to use a different tongue part.
    When you make D, you make the upper side just near the top of your tongue contact to the supramaxilla.
    When you make Japanese R, however, you should make the under side near the top of your tongue contact to the central supramaxilla.
    In order to do that, your tongue should be rolled up backwards.

    Just try it!

    ................
    In case that my English is still difficult for you to understand, I'd explain the knack in a different way.
    When you make R in English, your tongue and supramaxilla never contact each other, right?
    Instead of that you pull your tongue backwards, right?
    Then, if you pull your tongue backwards and at the same time make your tongue contact to your jaw, you can make Japanese R.

    ................
    The difference between L and Japanese R:
    L has a longer contact time than Japanese R. Make it shorter to contact.
    L has a wider tongue area to contact. Use more smaller area of the tongue.
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    hedomodo
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    The place of articulation for the Japanese R is the alveolar ridge. If I press the first knackle joint of my thumb against the border between the gum and the incisor, the tip of my thumb's nail is about halfway down the palate. An inch is just about this long. (I will stick to SI units hereafter and encourage others to use it too.)

    The place of articulation of the Japanese R and the English T is just about the same. The POA for R ranges from alveolar to alveo-palatal to palato-alveolar. The range is about 7 mm utmost. The area of contact is larger for R and T. The replease for R consists of a regular dropping of the tongue and a slight thrust forward. This way, the tongue is rolled at the apix before the tongue loses contact with the alveolar.

    This site has a lot of terms and ideas about phonetics I used in this post. The text is Japanese but key terms are given in Enlgish too.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I just found that #10 ,#8, and #4 were wrong.
    My advice was probably no use to change the sound effectively to the original poster.
    I'm sorry.
    The more important thing turned out to keep the nasal airway open.

    When we pronounce D, L, R, we close the nasal airway unconsciously.
    Then the airflow to oral cavity increases, and make the clearer/stronger explosive sounds.
    When I pronounce Japanese R, I just found that I keep the nasal airway open.
    Thus the airflow to oral cavity decreases, and make the weaker explosive sound, which is recognized as "the typical Japanese R sound."



    FAST PIC » イメージビューアー

    In conclusion, Japanese R sound is a kind of "nasal sounds" in a certain point of view.
    (Maybe I'm wrong. Anyone who has objections to this idea, just let me know. I'll appreciate it.)
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    hedomodo
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Minor correction to #9:
    The replease for R consists of -> The release for R consists of

    SLTD, my #9 was meant to rebut your previous posts. This too is written against your #11.

    While your R in Japanese may be articulated with some air current passing through the nasal cavity, any stop consonants can get nasal colouring. English stops too can be uttered with some nasal colouring. It doesn't make a typical Japanese R sound.

    You seem to be accounting for "the weaker explosive sound" of R by the nasal air current. R has weaker explosive element than T because the occlusion of the former is not complete.

    Your revised illustration still shows that the POA of the Japanese R is about one inch (ca. 2.54 cm) away from the base of the incisors. I am not sure if you meant it this way, but the illustration shows most of the movable part of the tongue curled backwards. This would make it more like the English R. The POA of the Japanese R varies from person to person but it's like that of the Japanese T or the English T (somewhere on the alveolar ridge). I am not sure if I understand the illustration as you meant it. Could you describe how your Japanese R is different from the English R, Japanese T and other consonants?
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    先の投稿(#11)も間違っていることを発見しましたので、先の投稿(#11)とは違う意見を書きます。日本語で書きます。

    ・まず、日本語のRと英語のRは舌が上顎に接するか接しないかにより全く異なると思います。
    ・日本語のRと英語のLは似ているけど、英語のLは場合によっては舌を上顎につけっぱなしになったり、開放させるとしてもよりゆっくりで、破裂して音を作り出す程度が少ないと思います。上顎に接する面積もより大きいと思います。(さらに後で説明いたします、口の奥の緊張具合も異なっているようです。)
    ・日本語のRと英語のDですが、英語のDを発音するときには前歯の付け根付近の上顎に接しますが、日本語のRを発音するときは、私の場合はそこよりも少なくても1cmは後方の上顎が上方に窪んでいくところで接するようです。しかしながら、この舌と上顎の接する位置の違いは、両者の音の違いの本質ではないようです。なぜなら、どちらの位置に舌を誘導しても、日本語のR音と、英語のD音を別物として発音することが可能であるからです。
    ・その理由を先のポストで私は、日本語のR音は、鼻に抜ける音であると説明しましたが、これも間違っているようです。なぜなら、日本語のR音を発音しているときに、鼻の穴をふさいでも音は変わりませんし、鼻側に気流が流れているフシもありませんから。
    ・しかしながら、日本語のR音と、英語のD(T)音は全く違う音になります。『Dの時は口蓋垂が鼻側への気流を防ぐように閉じる、』と前のイラストや英語で解説しましたが、自分の口の奥で実際にどのように動いているのかは正確にはわかりません。舌の後方で塞ぐのか、口蓋垂のところで塞ぐのかもわかりません。しかしながら、D音を作るときは、口の奥の『後方』を緊張させて、口の奥で形成される空洞をより狭めるようにして、同じ肺活量で吐いた時でも、より多くの気流が流れるようにしているようです。その気流が前歯の付け根付近で上顎と舌の先端で一瞬せき止められ、次の瞬間勢い良く開放されて破裂音を形成します。それに反して、日本語のR音は、口の奥の『後方』が弛緩/リラックスしていて、口の奥で形成される空洞がより広い感じです。同じ肺活量で吐いた時でも、気流がより少なくなり、日本語のR音を作ります。
     この弛緩しているというのは、あたかも、英語のlaw とlowを発音するときに、lowはロウと2重母音を口を緊張させて発音させるのに対してlawはローと口を弛緩させて発音する時にちょっと似ています。 でもlawという時に力が抜けているのは、下顎の力が抜けていて口の前の方の力が抜けているのですが、日本語のRは口の奥の後ろ側の力が抜けている点で異なっています。
     
     英語のD音を、声帯を震わせずに、囁き声(無声音)とするとT音になりますが、T音は明瞭に発音することができます。
    英語のRや英語のLも囁き声(無声音?)で発音することができます。
    しかしながら、日本語のR音は、同じくらいの息の量で発音しようとすると、囁き声(無声音)としては、音にならないくらいの弱さになってしまいます。これは、舌の先端と上顎での閉鎖の程度の違いではなく、より後方の口腔の後部の緊張具合の違いによるのだと思います。

     いかがでしょうか? 
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    hedomodo
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    先の投稿(#11)も間違っていることを発見しましたので、先の投稿(#11)とは違う意見を書きます。日本語で書きます。
    「違う意見」とこれまでの意見の関連をい明確にすることが望ましいです。「間違っている」箇所を引用しコメントを付ける形でポストを書くと、一見して分かるようになると思います。

    ・まず、日本語のRと英語のRは舌が上顎に接するか接しないかにより全く異なると思います。
    舌が上顎に接しているか最も近づく位置(調音位置; place of articulation)はどうでしょうか。英語のRの方が口腔の奥の方ではありませんか?

    ・日本語のRと英語のLは似ているけど、英語のLは場合によっては舌を上顎につけっぱなしになったり、開放させるとしてもよりゆっくりで、破裂して音を作り出す程度が少ないと思います。上顎に接する面積もより大きいと思います。(さらに後で説明いたします、口の奥の緊張具合も異なっているようです。)
    Lは側面音に分類され、舌が上顎に接する部位の両側から気流がもれます。最初から閉鎖が完全ではないのです。これはLの発音するよう口の中の形を準備して、息を口から吐いてみれば分かります。

    接触面積が大きいことは同意です。

    ・日本語のRと英語のDですが、英語のDを発音するときには前歯の付け根付近の上顎に接しますが、日本語のRを発音するときは、私の場合はそこよりも少なくても1cmは後方の上顎が上方に窪んでいくところで接するようです。しかしながら、この舌と上顎の接する位置の違いは、両者の音の違いの本質ではないようです。なぜなら、どちらの位置に舌を誘導しても、日本語のR音と、英語のD音を別物として発音することが可能であるからです。
    子音の違いは、調音位置(とりあえずこのスレッドに関する限りは、舌の上顎のどの部分に接するか、もっとも近づくか)と調音方法(閉鎖、摩擦、破擦など)でおもに記述されます。「少なくても1cmは後方の上顎が上方に窪んでいくところで接する」というのを再度確認します。切歯の間の歯茎には口蓋縫線があります。人体を左右に分つ、いわゆる正中線に沿って存在する線の一つです。私はこの口蓋縫線が消える箇所で日本語のRを出しているのですが、SLTDさんはもう少し上で調音しているのですね。1 cm程度なら英語のRよりは遥かに手前で、日本語のRの調音位置として自然な範囲の上限近くだと思います。

    ・その理由を先のポストで私は、日本語のR音は、鼻に抜ける音であると説明しましたが、これも間違っているようです。なぜなら、日本語のR音を発音しているときに、鼻の穴をふさいでも音は変わりませんし、鼻側に気流が流れているフシもありませんから。
    私が#12で指摘したことを繰り返すと、鼻音でない子音でもわずかに鼻から気流がでることがあります。もちろん鼻音ほどの量ではありません。また、鼻腔に空気がある限り、そこで共鳴が起こります。

    ・しかしながら、日本語のR音と、英語のD(T)音は全く違う音になります。『Dの時は口蓋垂が鼻側への気流を防ぐように閉じる、』と前のイラストや英語で解説しましたが、自分の口の奥で実際にどのように動いているのかは正確にはわかりません。舌の後方で塞ぐのか、口蓋垂のところで塞ぐのかもわかりません。しかしながら、D音を作るときは、口の奥の『後方』を緊張させて、口の奥で形成される空洞をより狭めるようにして、同じ肺活量で吐いた時でも、より多くの気流が流れるようにしているようです。その気流が前歯の付け根付近で上顎と舌の先端で一瞬せき止められ、次の瞬間勢い良く開放されて破裂音を形成します。それに反して、日本語のR音は、口の奥の『後方』が弛緩/リラックスしていて、口の奥で形成される空洞がより広い感じです。同じ肺活量で吐いた時でも、気流がより少なくなり、日本語のR音を作ります。
    厳密には「口蓋垂が鼻側への気流を防ぐように閉じる」のではなく、口蓋帆が持ち上がることで鼻腔を閉鎖します。口蓋垂自体は小さすぎて鼻腔を閉鎖できません。口蓋帆が挙上すると連動して奥舌も持ち上がることがあります。奥舌が口蓋帆や口蓋垂に接するなら、それらが持ち上がっているのを支えている訳で、広い意味で鼻腔の閉鎖に関与しているともいえるでしょう。「口の奥の『後方』を緊張させて…」以降の説明は良く分かりませんでした。

    そこで、私が標準的と思う音声学上の説明をします。舌で口腔内に閉鎖を作って、肺から空気を送ると、閉鎖の手前の空間で空気圧が高まります。閉鎖を一気に解除すると閉鎖の先に気流が流れます。これが破裂音(閉鎖音とも)の作り方です。閉鎖は口腔の幾つかの箇所で作ることができ、それがTやKやPの違いです。一方、日本語のRでは舌の先が上顎に接しているに過ぎず、閉鎖は起こりません。肺気流を送り込むとすぎに舌を上顎から離すので、調音位置の前後で空気圧の差がほとんどできないのです。

     この弛緩しているというのは、あたかも、英語のlaw とlowを発音するときに、lowはロウと2重母音を口を緊張させて発音させるのに対してlawはローと口を弛緩させて発音する時にちょっと似ています。 でもlawという時に力が抜けているのは、下顎の力が抜けていて口の前の方の力が抜けているのですが、日本語のRは口の奥の後ろ側の力が抜けている点で異なっています。
    これも良く分からなかったのですが、口の緊張または弛緩は母音をつくる口の構えに由来するのではありませんか。子音を発音するときにすでに直後の母音の口の構えも準備しておくことはよくあります。
     
     英語のD音を、声帯を震わせずに、囁き声(無声音)とするとT音になりますが、T音は明瞭に発音することができます。
    英語のRや英語のLも囁き声(無声音?)で発音することができます。
    しかしながら、日本語のR音は、同じくらいの息の量で発音しようとすると、囁き声(無声音)としては、音にならないくらいの弱さになってしまいます。これは、舌の先端と上顎での閉鎖の程度の違いではなく、より後方の口腔の後部の緊張具合の違いによるのだと思います。
    日本語のRは弾き音なので、肺気流を送り出すと舌が倒れ、もう一度口を構え直すまで発音できません。SLTDさんが例に挙げた他の音は継続的にかつかなり強い気流をかけても発音できるところが違います。


    追加) waterが「ワター」ではなく「ワラー」、betterが「ベラー」に聞こえるのは、第一アクセントの母音の次の子音であって、口腔の後部を緊張させるヒマがないからだと考えると納得できるような気がします。
    「口腔の後部を緊張させる」の意味がだんたんわかってきた気がします。閉鎖を作り空気圧をかけること、またそのために必要な筋肉の収縮をさしていっているのでしょうか。日本語のRは結構ばらつきがあるのでアメリカ英語のwaterにおけるtでも自然に聞こえます。強いて違いを見つけるなら、日本語のRは側面音でもある、つまり舌が上顎に接している箇所の左右から気流がわずかにもれ出ていることを特徴とするのではないでしょうか。Wikipedia s.v. Flap consonant

    #9で私が一度言及したサイト「言語学の基礎」の音声学は参考になります。
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for your feedbackFlaminius
    舌が上顎に接しているか最も近づく位置(調音位置; place of articulation)はどうでしょうか。英語のRの方が口腔の奥の方ではありませんか?
    そのとおりです。

    Lは側面音に分類され、舌が上顎に接する部位の両側から気流がもれます。最初から閉鎖が完全ではないのです。これはLの発音するよう口の中の形を準備して、息を口から吐いてみれば分かります。
    そのとおりだと思います。

    私が#12で指摘したことを繰り返すと、鼻音でない子音でもわずかに鼻から気流がでることがあります。もちろん鼻音ほどの量ではありません。また、鼻腔に空気がある限り、そこで共鳴が起こります。
    なろほどそのとおりだと思います。口の後方に広いスペースを感じるのは鼻腔での共鳴なのでしょう。


    ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
    さて、今回のスレッドの#11以降で私が発見したことを、数式で簡潔に書くとすると、
    日本語のR + K = T 
    または
    日本語のR = T - K
    です。

    つまり、Tを発音する時に、舌で上顎をふさぎますが、それだけであると、Lのようにベロの両側から息が抜けてしまいますよね。
    Tを発音する時に、その直前に空気をせきとめているのは、ベロの先ではなくて、口蓋帆なのです。つまりKを発音する時の
    空気の遮断と同じことをしています。それを解放する時に舌の先の状況の違いによって、K音とT音に分かれるわけです。
    日本語のRを発音するときは、口蓋帆が閉じない点では英語のLに似ているけれども、舌の先の動きは英語のTと良く似ている、ということになります。
    英語のRも口蓋帆を閉じない点では日本語のRに似ているけれども、ベロが上顎に接しないことから全く違う音になってしまいます。

    Water のTを発音するときには、ネイティブが発音する時に一々口蓋帆を閉じることをしないから、「わらー」に近い音になることになります。

    って、これって、他の成書にも書いてあるんでしょうね。
    あるいは、すでにこのスレッドの他の投稿で述べられていたことなんですか?
    もしそうでなければ、ひょっとして私の大発見で、ノーベル言語賞をもらえるんじゃないかと思うんですが。haha

    @Original poster: I believe this time I can tell you the true knack.
    Try T - K!
    When you make K sound, you make your palatine sail closed and then open.
    When you make T sound, you're doing the same thing as well.
    If you keep your palatine sail open during pronouncing T, your sound will become the Japanese R sound!
     
    Last edited:

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    FAST PIC » イメージビューアー

    I tried to illustrate the difference.

    口の後部を緊張させて気道を塞いでいるのは、口蓋帆というよりも、舌の後ろ側の筋肉なのではないかと思います。(完全に私見です。)
    なぜなら、N音を発音する時には明らかに鼻腔側に空気が流れますが、口腔側には流れません。口蓋垂があるあたりの口蓋帆が下側にシフトして口腔側の血流を遮断するのではなく、舌の後部が後ろにせり出すのだと思います。そして、N音の時よりもさらに一段力むと、完全に鼻腔の血流も遮断されますが、これは、舌の後ろの筋肉によって、口蓋帆が上方に圧排されるからだと思います。(エコーかCTかなにかで実際に検証してみればはっきりすると思いますが。)この点についてはいかがでしょうか?また間違ってますでしょうか?

    edit (→自分でやってみると口腔の気流を確保しつつ、鼻腔への気流を遮断することもできるようですので、口蓋帆を挙上させて鼻腔への気道を閉鎖させることも可能のようです。つまり口蓋帆にも筋肉があって、随意に動かせる、ということになりますよね。でも、口腔側への血流(これは気流のタイポでした)を遮断するためには、舌の後ろ側も使わざるを得ないと思います。そうでなければ、口蓋帆が同時に上方と下方に肥大して、鼻腔と口腔の両方を遮断する、っていうあり得ない状況を考えなければならなくなるからです。)


    edit2
    Phonetics: The sounds of American English
    僕の自説はこのビデオによると間違いのようでした。ngの時とKの時は、舌の後ろも使いますが、TやRやLの時は軟口蓋しか使わないようですね。

    According to the video, all R, L, T are pronounced with the nasal cavity closed, by the action of soft palate.
    When you pronounce Japanese R, you can move your tongue just as making T, yet, you should not close the nasal cavity with the soft palate.

    (これってひょっとすると#6その他ですでに述べられていたことですかね。そうなら大変失礼しました。)
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    hedomodo
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    SLTDさんは間違いを認めるならどこが間違いなのかはっきりさせるべきです。編集で意見を変更する場合は、間違っている箇所を訂正線で消してください。[s][/s]タグを使ってください。#15および#16は間違いが多いだけでなく、「血流」のような全く無関係な事柄への言及もあり、混乱の極みにあります。率直にいって、全ての間違いに反論を加える余裕は私にはないので、今まで私が書いたことや参考に供したページを読み返してください。

    When you pronounce Japanese R, you can move your tongue just as making T, yet, you should not close the nasal cavity with the soft palate.

    Your argument contradicts with the phonetics page you mentioned in #16. You said the palatine sail does not close [the nasal cavity] for the Japanese R, nor for the English L:
    日本語のRを発音するときは、口蓋帆が閉じない点では英語のLに似ている

    The illustration (navigation: liquid -> l) in the page linked in SLTD #16 attests to the contrary. The Japanese R and the English L are not nasal but oral consonants. If very little air current passes through the nostrils when R is uttered, that's purely accidental or allophonic utmost.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    SLTDさんは間違いを認めるならどこが間違いなのかはっきりさせるべきです。編集で意見を変更する場合は、間違っている箇所を訂正線で消してください。[s][/s]タグを使ってください。#15および#16は間違いが多いだけでなく、「血流」のような全く無関係な事柄への言及もあり、混乱の極みにあります。
    わかりました。これからとりかかります。 I'm sorry for the confusion.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    If I can give my little contribution, as Flaminius said, the Japanese "r" is an alveolar consonant.
    Said this, we have two different "liquid" consonants in that area (let apart the "d" sound, because it is a stop, i.e you stop the flow of air and then release it), and these are the alveolar flap or tap [ɾ] (like that in the Spanish word "pero" or that in the American English words "a little bit of butter") and the alveolar lateral [l] (like in the Spanish word "leche" or in the English word "light"). The difference is that in the [ɾ] there is a vibration (single contact in the flap, multiple in the trill, i.e in the Italian [r]) while in the [l] the air flows "laterally" (not from the center of the tongue, like it happens with the [ɾ]).

    The Japanese "r" is between these two sounds, the phonetic symbol used is [ɺ] and it's called lateral flap.
    In reality, it is not always the same sound. The same person sometimes pronounces it with 1/3 of flap and 2/3 of lateral airflow, sometimes with 2/3 of flap and 1/3 of lateral airflow. In the first case it will sound more like an [l] and in the second case more like an [ɾ].

    I noticed that many singers when giving more emphasis or stress on the syllable, pronounce this letter more like an "l" and vice versa, when the word is pronounced faster the sound is more similar to an "r".

    If you're interested you can find a more complete description of the Japanese pronunciation in this page
     
    Last edited:

    vintage_d3vil

    Member
    American English
    Hi guys. Thank you all. These are all valuable information. Unfortunately, I'm just starting to learn Japanese, so I couldn't understand the conversation between Flaminius and SoLaTiDoberman. I think it's still possible to make the Japanese r in the same spot as the English t/d. I think I understand what Nino83 is trying to tell us. I do view the Japanese r more like the L sound. I only mentioned the d sound because someone told me it is similar to the t's in "butter" and "little".
    The Japanese "r" is between these two sounds, the phonetic symbol used is [ɺ] and it's called lateral flap.
    In reality, it is not always the same sound. The same person sometimes pronounces it with 1/3 of flap and 2/3 of lateral airflow, sometimes with 2/3 of flap and 1/3 of lateral airflow. In the first case it will sound more like an [l] and in the second case more like an [ɾ].

    I noticed that many singers when giving more emphasis or stress on the syllable, pronounce this letter more like an "l" and vice versa, when the word is pronounced faster the sound is more similar to an "r".

    If you're interested you can find a more complete description of the Japanese pronunciation in this page
    Regarding the quote above, I actually thought the Spanish r and the Japanese r are exactly the same. I never knew they were different. According to what you explained to me, you're saying that the English L is a lateral sound, in which the sound mainly flows through the contact between the sides of the tongue tip and the alveolar ridge. On the other hand, the Spanish r also contacts the alveolar ridge with the tongue tip except the area of contact is mainly on the center of the tongue tip rather than the sides. By the way, I now realized that when I make the english L sound, it's actually the sides of the tongue tip that are contacting the ridge, not the center; you are right. Now since you said that the Japanese r is somewhere between these two sounds, I decided to try making a L sound by contacting mainly the "center" of my tongue tip against the alveolar ridge. And let me tell you, it works! Personally, not relating to Japanese, it will be quite an accomplishment for m if I can extend a Spanish r trill. Thank you so much guys.
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I think it's still possible to make the Japanese r in the same spot as the English t/d. I only mentioned the d sound because someone told me it is similar to the t's in "butter" and "little".
    It's better to call the sounds with their own names in order to avoid confusion and misunderstandings.
    The sounds /d/ and /t/ are those present in words like deep and time, [diːp] and [tʰaɪm].
    The American English sound of letter, better or butter is not a /d/, like in deep, but it is an alveolar flap/tap, i.e a Spanish, Portuguese [ɾ], in fact it is called alveolar flapping, tapping or flap t, tap t.
    Flapping - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    You can agree on the fact that the sound of letter, better, butter [leɾɹ̩] [beɾɹ̩] [bʌɾɹ̩] is different from that of deep, date, do [diːp] [deɪt] [duː].
    In fact in many Spanish books for American speakers there are examples like "pot of tea" = "para ti" [ˌpɑːɾəˈtiː] (AmE) [ˌpaɾaˈti] (Spanish).
    So, call this sound "Spanish r", "alveolar flap/tap", "flap/tap r", calling it "d" is just confusing ("d" is the sound of deep, not that of letter).
    Calling it "d/t" is confusing also for the other non-American English speakers, who pronounce letter with a "t" [ˈletə] (RP) or with a glottal stop [ˈleʔə] (Estuary English).
    I actually thought the Spanish r and the Japanese r are exactly the same. I never knew they were different.
    When you say put it up, you're just pronouncing the Spanish "r", [ˌpʊɾɪˈɾʌp].
    The Japanese "r" is in the middle, between the Spanish "r" (or the American flap "r") and the "l".
    I now realized that when I make the english L sound, it's actually the sides of the tongue tip that are contacting the ridge, not the center
    The main difference is not in the part of the tongue that contacts the ridge, but in the fact that when you pronounce an "l" the air doesn't flow from the center of the mouth but from the sides, from the part of the mouth that is not "closed" by the tongue, while when you pronounce a flap "r" the air flows from the center of the mouth.
    You can feel the difference putting one hand in front of your mouth and pronouncing the "l" and the "r". You'll feel that when you pronounce the "l" a larger part of your hand feels the airflow.

    Anyway, if you use your flap "r" (i.e the consonant of letter, better, butter) you'll be understood, because the Japanese (if they're not trained for it) don't make any difference between flap "r" and "l" (they too pronounce this sound sometimes more like an "r" and sometimes more like an "l").
    So your put it up [ˌpʊɾɪˈɾʌp] won't be so dissimilar to the way a Japanese would pronounce ぷりらっぷ.
     
    Last edited:

    vintage_d3vil

    Member
    American English
    The main difference is not in the part of the tongue that contacts the ridge, but in the fact that when you pronounce an "l" the air doesn't flow from the center of the mouth but from the sides, from the part of the mouth that is not "closed" by the tongue, while when you pronounce a flap "r" the air flows from the center of the mouth.
    You can feel the difference putting one hand in front of your mouth and pronouncing the "l" and the "r". You'll feel that when you pronounce the "l" a larger part of your hand feels the airflow.
    Oh I see. So for the English L sound, the sides of the tongue aren't touching, for that would prevent the airflow? I tried putting my hands in front of my mouth. You are right. I do feel the difference. To be honest, I don't know what's happening in my mouth when I make the D and L sound.
     
    Top