1. Jeremy Sharpe Member

    Canada, English
    Hi,

    In French class one day we were discussing common mistakes in French such as saying 'Je suis chaud' instead of 'J'ai chaud'. I've heard from one French teacher who is actually from Quebec that this can mean 'I am drunk', but my current French teacher has never heard of that interpretation and sees it more like 'I am full of lust' or something to that effect. (Of course, both these meanings are somewhat similar) What do you think? I'm kind of curious now what people in France would take this phrase to mean. Also, if you want, give your interpretation of 'je suis froid', which I've heard is like the English word 'cold' as in 'cold personality'.

    Thanks,

    :)
     
  2. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    For me, "je suis chaud" can be used for instance by a athlet who has warmed up (we call that... s'échauffer, in French) and is ready now to perfom. It means : OK, now my muscles are ready, I can enter the arena :)
    Same thing for a singer and his voice, or someone who is ready to do something difficult.

    CAREFUL :warn:
    NOT TO BE USED FOR A WOMAN, then it means : she loves making love with men and she's good in it. Hum. Not really a compliment to say to a lady !! Very vulgar. Generally used by men when there is no woman around, haha !
     
  3. Jeremy Sharpe Member

    Canada, English
    :eek: Bien sur, je ne pense pas que je utiliserai cette expression! C'est un peu dangereuse...
     
  4. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
  5. Benjy

    Benjy Senior Member

    Milton Keynes, UK
    English - English
    être froid does apply to personality. someone who is "cold" i guess like in english..

    ca nous aurait laissé froid. i don't know how to translate that, but its another usage of froid as an adjective. someelse want to explain?

    <random comment>
    this thread reminds me of an instance where i and another english speaker (i wont mention his nationality) were round the house of an old french lady. it was quite a hot day and she was wearing quite a lot of clothing. to make conversation the guy says to her "vous êtes chaude" and i whisper to him "you do not want to be saying that.. it's vous avez chaud" the old lady had this look of mortification mingled with a complete lack of understanding (why the guy had said that) mistaking her dazed expression for her not understanding his sentence he then repeated himself like 6 times depsite my trying to tell him to stop :eek:
    <random comment/>
     
  6. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Bonjour Ben :)
    I would translate it by "indifferent", without any reaction = "ça nous aurait laissés indifférents".
    Hope that's clear, hum :(
     
  7. Benjy

    Benjy Senior Member

    Milton Keynes, UK
    English - English
    yes. thats perfect :D and now i have another way of saying the same htign in french. thanks
     
  8. sophievm Senior Member

    Région parisienne
    France - français
    Another one : "ça nous a laissé de glace".
     
  9. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    chaud, chaudasse (adj.) *
    saoul : ça m'fait chier quand tu rentres chaud à' maison. Syn. en boisson
    Source:
    http://www.angelfire.com/pq/lexique/lexique.html
    Used only in Canada.
    Do not use "chaud" and "chaudasse" elsewhere unless you understand the above warning.
     
  10. Nywoe Senior Member

    Canada: English and French
    As for "saoul", that is the old spelling of "soûl(e)", meaning drunk (ivre). Although correct, I had never seen it before.
     
  11. sophievm Senior Member

    Région parisienne
    France - français
    "saoûl" is the right spelling.
     
  12. le chat noir

    le chat noir Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    "je suis chaud" (for a guy only !) may also mean either "I'm in the mood (for fun)" or "I am begining to loose my temper (out of excitement)" in French slang, but it would be rather surprising to hear that from a non-native French speaker.
     
  13. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Non, Sophie :) Nywoe a raison. Il existe saoul et soûl (l'ancienne et la nouvelle graphie) !
     
  14. sophievm Senior Member

    Région parisienne
    France - français
    Je maintiens qu'il existe soûl et saoûl ;-)
     
  15. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    Le Trésor de la langue française et le Petit Robert ne mettent pas d'accent pour l'ancienne orthographe avec un "a" . Est-ce que c'est Larousse ou un autre qui n'est pas d'accord?
     
  16. Addyblue

    Addyblue Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France, French native speaker
     
  17. Nywoe Senior Member

    Canada: English and French
    soûl, soûle
    [su, sul] adj. VAR. vieilli saoul, saoule
    saoul 1265; lat. satullus, de satur « rassasié »

    1&uml; Vx Rassasié, repu.
    à Mod. et littér. Rassasié au point d'être dégoûté. « Soûl de plaisir » (Toulet).
    à N. m. (XVe) TOUT MON (TON, SON, etc.)SOÛL : à satiété, autant qu'on veut. Þ content, suffisance (cf. Jusqu'à plus soif*). Fumer tout son soûl. Seule, « elle pourrait sangloter tout son saoul » (Martin du Gard).

    2&uml; (1534) Fam. Ivre*. Il était soûl comme un cochon, comme une grive, comme un âne, comme un Polonais, comme une bourrique, très ivre. Fin soûl.

    à Fig. Enivré, grisé. « Ces gens, soûls de paroles, sont les plus sobres du monde » (Constantin-Weyer).

    This is according to Le Petit Robert, so as you can see, it is either soûl(e) or saoul(e).

    N.

     
  18. franceaz Member

    Phoenix, Arizona
    France, French
    I also heard this expression (tu es chaud) when I was a kid and we were playing hide-and-seek or cache-tampon. When we would get close to the person or thing we were looking for, the other one would say "tu es chaud."
     
  19. le chat noir

    le chat noir Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    That is a very specific context : for a game of hide-and-seek, the "temperature" would mean the proximity of the sought object or person :
    "tu gèles" -> you are really far from it,
    "c'est froid" -> you are far from the goal,
    "c'est chaud" -> you are nearing the goal,
    "tu brûles" -> you are quite close to it,
    and so on.

    I wonder if an equivalent exists in English?
     
  20. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    You also hear chaud meaning saoul in France, I never heard chaudasse (which by no account means that it does not exist!;) )
     
  21. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Now when you want to say you're not eager to do something, you're not very enthusiastic, you'd rather not do it, you say "je ne suis pas (très) chaud"

    - Il faudrait qu'on aille voir ma mère demain
    - Je ne suis pas très chaud pour y aller.

    Comme il pleut très fort, je ne suis pas très chaud pour sortir

    Often used when someone fears the consequences of an action. In fact, it seems to be an understatement. When you are "pas très chaud", you're really very reluctant.
     
  22. Nywoe Senior Member

    Canada: English and French
    Yes, it does.

    You're freezing.
    You're cold.
    You're getting warmer.
    You're hot! (burning! etc.)
     
  23. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Hide-and-seek is the english for cache-cache.

    But what's the English for "cache-tampon" (the game in which you hide an object instead of yourself).
     
  24. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Bonjour et bienvenue, Niko ! :)
    "s'il fait nuit dans ton pays" serait plus correct.
     
  25. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Bonjour LV4-26 :)

    J'ai trouvé "hunt the thimble" pour "cache-tampon" (la chasse au dé à coudre, c'est mignon !).
     
  26. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Bonjour Agnes et merci
    Très, en effet.:)
     
  27. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Agnès, :) que penses-tu de "hotter, colder" ?http://www.disbelieving.com/Games/gamesh.html
    (they also have "hide the thimble" in that games page)
     
  28. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Oui, c'est juste. Il faut ajouter que très souvent nous utilisons un dé à coudre même pour ce jeu (au moins c'est ce qu'on utilisait chez moi!!) et pas quelque chose d'autre.
     
  29. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Oui oui, cela semble correspondre ! :thumbsup:
    Nous, on y jouait avec un foulard quand j'étais petite...
    Quant au nom du jeu -hide ou hunt-, c'est une question de point de vue, probablement, haha !
     

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