Jeffrey Dean Morgan

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zhg

Senior Member
Chinese
I just read his wiki-page, and I got questions regarding his name.

1. Is Dean his middle name, and Morgan his surname? or "Dean Morgan" a compound surname?
2. Why whenever I google "Jeffrey Morgan" I get all the results showing me “Jeffrey Dean Morgan'? Does this mean nobody actually calls him Jeffery Morgan?
 
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  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Dean is common as both a forename (or middle name) and a surname, so I can't tell just from the name alone. Reading the article, I see his father was Richard Dean Morgan. That would make it more likely that their surname is Dean Morgan, but of course it's also possible that Richard Morgan gave his own middle name to his son.

    However, the article consistently calls him just Morgan. Sometimes two-word surnames can be shortened rather than repeated every time, but it would be strange if the article never called him Dean Morgan if that was his surname. So I conclude his surname is Morgan.

    Probably in his personal life he is Jeffrey (or Jeff) to his friends, but actors have fixed professional names. Possibly there was already an actor called Jeffrey (or Geoffrey) Morgan, so he needed to use a distinctive name. That's why Mary Moore became famous as Mary Tyler Moore, for example.
     

    zhg

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you entangledbank! I wonder if it applies to ordinary people as well. And Must everyone born in English speaking countries own a middle name?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No, you do not have to have a middle name, but many forms expect it so you can have some minor issues without one. :)

    I have never known a person of an English speaking background that had a "compound" surname that didn't use a hyphen.

    The various entertainment guilds and unions require unique names. There is a musician called Jeffrey Morgan, so the actor may be including his middle name just to make it different or perhaps he likes the sound of it as a "stage name."
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Two-part family names exist in England and other English-speaking countries. The actor Sacha Baron Cohen is one well-known example; his family name is Baron Cohen, with no hyphen*. However, they are rare. Usually, a hyphen separates the two parts. In the absence of any other information, one would normally expect Dean in Jeffrey Dean Morgan to be a middle name.

    _______________________
    *Many people mistakenly think that author Arthur Conan Doyle, of Sherlock Holmes fame, is another. He is not. His father was Charles Altamont Doyle.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    No, you do not have to have a middle name, but many forms expect it so you can have some minor issues without one. :)
    I have heard (but cannot confirm) stories of people being assigned Nmi (pronounced “nimmy”) as a middle name because they entered NMI on a form — “no middle initial.” :)
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I have never known a person of an English speaking background that had a "compound" surname that didn't use a hyphen.
    The Wikipedia article on Double-barrelled name provides a couple of the examples I was going to give plus a few more:

    Many double-barrelled names are written without a hyphen, which can cause confusion as to whether the surname is double-barrelled or not. Notable persons with unhyphenated double-barrelled names include prime minister David Lloyd George, the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, astronomer Robert Hanbury Brown, actors Kristin Scott Thomas and Helena Bonham Carter (although she has said the hyphen is optional) comedian Sacha Baron Cohen (however, his cousin Professor Simon Baron-Cohen opted for the hyphen) and Sylvia Llewelyn Davies.​
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    The Wikipedia article on Double-barrelled name provides a couple of the examples I was going to give plus a few more:

    Many double-barrelled names are written without a hyphen, which can cause confusion as to whether the surname is double-barrelled or not. Notable persons with unhyphenated double-barrelled names include prime minister David Lloyd George, the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, astronomer Robert Hanbury Brown, actors Kristin Scott Thomas and Helena Bonham Carter (although she has said the hyphen is optional) comedian Sacha Baron Cohen (however, his cousin Professor Simon Baron-Cohen opted for the hyphen) and Sylvia Llewelyn Davies.​
    And the composer Andrew Lloyd Webber. :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The Wikipedia article on Double-barrelled name provides a couple of the examples I was going to give plus a few more:

    Many double-barrelled names are written without a hyphen, which can cause confusion as to whether the surname is double-barrelled or not. Notable persons with unhyphenated double-barrelled names include prime minister David Lloyd George, the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, astronomer Robert Hanbury Brown, actors Kristin Scott Thomas and Helena Bonham Carter (although she has said the hyphen is optional) comedian Sacha Baron Cohen (however, his cousin Professor Simon Baron-Cohen opted for the hyphen) and Sylvia Llewelyn Davies.​
    I don't personally know any of those people. ;) Additionally, none of them are American like Jeffery Dean Morgan.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    2. Why whenever I google "Jeffrey Morgan" I get all the results showing me “Jeffrey Dean Morgan'? Does this mean nobody actually calls him Jeffery Morgan?
    If that's his professional name then he is always likely to be called that in any public forum. That's what distinguishes him from all the other Jeffrey Morgans. If he was called two different ways it might get confusing. If you search for Jeffrey Morgan and get mostly results for him, that means, the way Google works, he is the most famous one.

    In his personal life people he knows might call him Jeff Morgan. If he orders something from Amazon he might have it delivered to Jeff Morgan.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Editors Teresa Nielsen Hayden and Patrick Nielsen Hayden have a two word surname like this, and are American.
    The exception that proves the rule? ;) That's a name they created at their marriage. I wonder if they have any children and how their schools deal with it.
    At least some of the British examples above were born that way (ie it's from an older tradition of combining names not the new post-"women's lib" version). :)
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The Wikipedia article on Double-barrelled name provides a couple of the examples I was going to give plus a few more:

    Many double-barrelled names are written without a hyphen, which can cause confusion as to whether the surname is double-barrelled or not. Notable persons with unhyphenated double-barrelled names include prime minister David Lloyd George, the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, astronomer Robert Hanbury Brown, actors Kristin Scott Thomas and Helena Bonham Carter (although she has said the hyphen is optional) comedian Sacha Baron Cohen (however, his cousin Professor Simon Baron-Cohen opted for the hyphen) and Sylvia Llewelyn Davies.​
    Disproportionately many of these names seem Welsh, given that there are about 18 times as many people in England than in Wales. I wonder if unhyphenated two-part names are more common in Wales than elsewhere?
     
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