Jellyfish

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
"Jellyfish are probably the most numerous predators on Earth."
I would like to know:
1. If I leave "numerous", Is the meaning of the sentence not changed?
2. Could I put "the" before "Earth"?
Thanks.
 
  • cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    1. You can't leave out "numerous" (I assume you meant to say "leave out", rather than "leave".) You could use "plentiful" instead.
    2. You could put "the Earth", but it's not necessary.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thank you.
    What about " Jellfish are probably the most on Earth."?
    Is it correct?
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I just noticed that you asked whether the meaning is changed if you leave out "numerous". You would end up with "Jellyfish are probably the most predators on Earth", which doesn't make sense. Anyone hearing/reading that would think that you had misssed out a word after "most".

    They wouldn't assume that it was "numerous" that you had left out, either. You could have been saying "the most vicious predators", "the most colourful predators", "the most entertaining predators", in other words just about anything!
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi,
    "Jellyfish are probably the most numerous predators on Earth."
    I would like to know:
    1. If I leave "numerous", Is the meaning of the sentence not changed?
    2. Could I put "the" before "Earth"?
    Thanks.

    As other posters have said, you can't leave out "numerous" unless you intend to change the meaning of the sentence entirely.

    You could say "the earth" but it wouldn't sound correct because "on earth" is idiomatic. As well, if I hear the phrase "on the earth", I don't think of the entire earth (including the oceans) - I think of on the land. "On earth" indicates the entire life system which includes the oceans.
     
    Top