Jemandes täglich Brot

Roy776

Senior Member
German & AmE
Hallo miteinander,

weiß vielleicht jemand woher dieser Ausdruck stammt? Er scheint definitiv grammatikalisch falsch zu sein, denn eigentlich müsste es "jemandes tägliches Brot" heißen. Mir kam bereits der Gedanke, dass es sich womöglich um ein Adverb handeln könnte, was mir in dieser Position allerdings als nicht möglich erscheint. Weiß hier jemand vielleicht genaueres?

Danke im Voraus :)
 
  • fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    You realise, I trust, that this is from the Bible (Mt 6:11). Luther’s version reads: “Vnser teglich Brot gib vns heute.“ This dropping of the case endings of adjectives is commonplace in Early New High German.
     
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    Roy776

    Senior Member
    German & AmE
    No, I didn't realize that. I'm atheist, I don't even know the Lord's prayer by heart. Googling it, I still found only "Unser tägliches Brot gib uns heute."
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Whether religion should be considered part of ones culture or not is debatable, I think :)
    Whether it should be: may-be; whether it is: no. The influence of Christianity on European culture is so profound, this cannot be disentangled any more. The Luther-Bible is one of the, if not the, most important single source of the Modern High German standard language.
     
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    ablativ

    Senior Member
    German(y)
    Whether religion should be considered part of ones culture or not is debatable, I think :)
    fdb is right, of course. Luther and the Luther Bible must certainly be considered part of the European culture, no one can seriously deny that. Besides, Luther has been the "pioneer" of our existent currently spoken German language. Knowledge of those historic facts should also be part of a good educational background.

    Edit: crossed with berndf
     
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