jeopardized by this growing demand

fatiha

Senior Member
Arabic - Morocco
good evening

please what means this in arabic

see, i cannot let the quality of service which i always insist on be jeopardized by this growing demand.
thank you
fatiha
 
  • cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I suggest
    لا أستطيع أن أسمح للطلب المتزايد أن يؤثر على جودة الخدمة
    I skipped the "see", because I think it's colloquial, not written, but if you want to translate it we can use a word like إننى to express the confirmation. I also reversed the sentence order to make a clearer Arabic one.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I agree with you about "see," but I think you left some things out:

    cherine said:
    لا أستطيع أن أسمح للطلب المتزايد هذا (أو "لهذا الطلب المتزايد") أن يؤثر على جودة الخدمة التي أصر عليها دائماً
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Something can 'affect' something else in a good or a bad way, but the meaning of jeopardize is to affect something in a bad way; to put something at risk.

    Might I suggest:

    لا أستطيع أن أسمح للطلب المتزايد هذا أن يغرّر بجودة الخدمة التي أصر عليها دائما.

    or

    لا أستطيع أن أسمح للطلب المتزايد هذا أن يهوّر جودة الخدمة التي أصر عليها دائما.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Josh Adkins said:
    Something can 'affect' something else in a good or a bad way, but the meaning of jeopardize is to affect something in a bad way; to put something at risk.

    Might I suggest:

    لا أستطيع أن أسمح للطلب المتزايد هذا أن يغرّر بجودة الخدمة التي أصر عليها دائما.

    or

    لا أستطيع أن أسمح للطلب المتزايد هذا أن يهوّر جودة الخدمة التي أصر عليها دائما.
    I thought of that - but I couldn't think of a good Arabic equivalent for "jeopardize" in this context. The verbs you suggest are too literal. The second one especially reminds me of being in a car with a driver who's going too fast. The first is literary and rare; it might not even be understood, let alone convey the correct connotation.

    The thing is that although يؤثر على technically means "affect," the context here indicates that it's negatively affecting the quality.

    I'd be interested in what others have to say. :)
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    لا أقدر على ترك جودة الخدمة التي أصر عليها أن تتأثر بهذا الطالب المتزايد
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    elroy said:
    I thought of that - but I couldn't think of a good Arabic equivalent for "jeopardize" in this context. The verbs you suggest are too literal. The second one especially reminds me of being in a car with a driver who's going too fast. The first is literary and rare; it might not even be understood, let alone convey the correct connotation.

    The thing is that although يؤثر على technically means "affect," the context here indicates that it's negatively affecting the quality.

    I'd be interested in what others have to say. :)
    I agree with Elroy. And would like to add few things :
    1- another suggestion (it's true I left a part out, because I wrote my post in a hurry) :
    لا أستطيع أن أسمح لهذا الطلب المتزايد أن يُؤثـِّر بالسلب/سلبًا على جودة الخدمة التى أحرص/أصر عليها دائمًا
    2- The context is clear enough in denoting that the تأثير is sure negative, but I added the word بالسلب/سلبًا anyway.
    3- the verb يُهوّر I don't think it exists. Besides, التهور is used with someone who acts without much thinking, who is impulsive...
    4- the verb يغرر is indeed literal, and we use it in the newspapers -here at least- to speak of a man who seduced a girl غـرَّر بها to denote he also "abused" her. So using this verb in the context of this sentence -at least with Egyptian readership/audience- is not very wise :D
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    cherine said:
    3- the verb يُهوّر I don't think it exists. Besides, التهور is used with someone who acts without much thinking, who is impulsive...
    If it does exist, it certainly does not have the connotation we're after. التهور would be "recklessness"; that's why it evoked the image of the driver. :)

    Josh Adkins said:
    What about يعرّض للخطر ?
    Again, too literal. That literally means "to expose to danger" or "to put at risk."

    Even in English, you're not really "exposing the quality of the service to danger." The verb "jeopardize" has come to be used loosly in English to convey the meaning of "affect negatively," "compromise," etc., which is why I think that يؤثر على is the best translation we've heard so far.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I Agree with Elroy about the connotation of tahawwur.
    As for "Yu3arridu lilkhatar", it is not to literal but rather too much of a connotation for such a context. Jeopardizing a quality is affecting it, not really putting it at risk.

    So again I'd go for يؤثر على . It's one of those situations where it's better avoiding literal translation; or where "betraying" the original text is better than trying to be too faithful :)

    P.S. Another suggestion : يُـفسـِد but still, yu2aththir is better. :)
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    It doesn't seem too literal to me. 'To expose to risk, or danger', is the definition of jeopardize -- and with regards to economics I would use the word risk. Risk is definitely one of the most used words in economics. You could exchange the word jeopardize in fatiha's sentence and replace it with 'expose to risk' and get the same meaning.
    Risk and danger are both trabslated as خطر in Arabic. If not by khaTar, then I do not know how the idea of risk (in economics) is expressed in Arabic.

    I cannot let the quality of service which I always insist on be jeopardized by this growing demand.
    I cannot let the quality of service which I always insist on be exposed to risk by this growing demand (or: ...be exposed to this risk of growing demand.)
    I'm not sugessting that يعرّض للخطر is better than what you suggested, just that it should not be summarily thrown out and is indeed a worthy alternative.

    yuhawwaru is a verb. It is in the Hans Wehr and it is even in the online Sakhr dictionary. Of course, like you say, it might lend itself more to endangerment as a result of recklessness.


    -------
    Edit: I did not realize you posted right before I did, cherine. We must have been typting at the same time.:)
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    As I said Josh, I -personally- think it's rather too strong a connotation than too literal.
    Josh Adkins said:
    Risk and danger are both trabslated as خطر in Arabic. If not by khaTar, then I do not know how the idea of risk (in economics) is expressed in Arabic.
    The idea of risk in economics is expressed by مخاطرة wich is almost the same of course, with a slight difference : khaTar is risk, mukhaaTara is taking a risk.

    Josh Adkins said:
    I'm not sugessting that يعرّض للخطر is better than what you suggested, just that it should not be summarily thrown out and is indeed a worthy alternative.
    That's why I'm thinking about :
    لا أستطيع أن أخاطر بإفساد مستوى الجودة الذى أحرص عليه دائمًا بالاستسلام لهذا الطلب المتزايد​
    What do you think of this one ?

    Josh Adkins said:
    yuhawwaru is a verb. It is in the Hans Wehr and it is even in the online Sakhr dictionary. Of course, like you say, it might lend itself more to endangerment as a result of recklessness.
    slight correction : yuhawwiru, and a comment : the verb is very rarely used, IF ever used by any. You risk ;) getting not being understood (sorry for the stupid structure) if you use it.

    Josh Adkins said:
    Edit: I did not realize you posted right before I did, cherine. We must have been typting at the same time.:)
    Yes. And I did it again, only this time it was me who were writing after you posted :)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In English, it sounds ok to say "put the quality of the service at risk." In Arabic it sounds weird to use "yu3arridu lil-khaTar" in this case. I'm not saying you can't use it in other contexts referring to economics - just not in this particular one.

    What I meant when I said that it was too literal is that it sounds as if you were actively placing the "quality" in a precarious or dangerous situation. Basically, I don't think we tend to use it with abstract nouns.

    Cherine's latest version sounds ok, I guess, but I still like the other one better.
     
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