Jesus saves but Moses invests.

  • Tabac

    Senior Member
    U. S. - English
    There is an old chestnut, "Jesus saves, but Moses invest."

    What does it mean? Thanks.
    It may be an old chestnut, but I've never heard it.
    "Jesus saves" refers to salvation of a person by the son of God, but "saves" can also refer to putting away money in a bank for future use. To "invest" is to put money in stocks, bonds, real estate, hoping that it will increase in value. Exactly how Moses figures, I'm not sure.
     

    vachecow

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I have heard this saying before:

    Jesus Saves, Moses Invests, But only Buddha pays Dividends.

    I still don't understand the Moses part, but hopefully this can shed some light on it.
     
    There are many examples of this on the net, Dandelion.

    I have never heard it, but I think it is Jewish humour.

    Since Jews don't believe that Jesus is the Saviour, and since most Jews like to make money (no offence - don't we all?) they are thinking of Moses' rise to fame and wealth. After all, the baby Moses was cast away in a basket on the river and was adopted by a pharoah's princess daughter. He started out in poverty and rose to great heights in Egypt. He was called "The Father of all the Prophets."

    This is in no way meant to be offensive. I'm trying to explain what it means.

    I don't think I've made a very good job of it.

    Perhaps a Jewish person will reply.

    LRV
     

    MNL235

    New Member
    English
    If the first part about Jesus is a double-entendre mixing religion and finances, it makes sense that the second part about Moses should also be a double entendre along the same lines. Just limiting the joke to usurious practices among the Jews isn't funny nor creative. Give whoever came up with the joke credit that they perceived a pattern and imitated it.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    If the first part about Jesus is a double-entendre mixing religion and finances, it makes sense that the second part about Moses should also be a double entendre along the same lines. Just limiting the joke to usurious practices among the Jews isn't funny nor creative. Give whoever came up with the joke credit that they perceived a pattern and imitated it.
    The question was about explaining the joke, not eliciting opinions about its humor.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In the joke, Moses represents Jews and "investing" represents moneylending. Jews are associated with moneylending because in Europe during the middle ages. much of the moneylending was done by Jews, who were a minority in these Christian countries.

    In some area of Europe, the Christian church forbid moneylending by Christians (though that rule was sometimes ignored). You could loan money or goods to a friend, but you could not charge interest. Charging interest was "usury".
     
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