jet nai heed [volleyball]

ManOfWords

Senior Member
Português [Brasil]
Jet Nai Heed : The act of intentionally blocking a spike from the opposing team.

That's a volleyball jargon ... but, every block has that intention. Can somebody provide further explanation? :confused:
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Jet Nai Heed : The act of intentionally blocking a spike from the opposing team.

    That's a volleyball jargon ... but, every block has that intention. Can somebody provide further explanation? :confused:
    Is every play by the opponents an attempt to spike? In other words, some blocks are attempting to block shots that are not spike attempts, right?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I know nothing about volleyball - what is a "spike"?
    A volleyball spike is like a tennis overhead slam: it is hitting the ball in a downward direction over the net so that it lands inside the opponenents court. And hitting it as hard as possible. If the other team fails to keep the ball from touching the ground (inside their court) they lose the point.

    Spiking is difficult because the net is very high (well above standing head height), so hitting it downward over the net can only happen if the ball is close to the net and higher than the net, and the player jumps high and hits it at exactly the right time.

    Each side is allowed 3 hits before the ball must go over the net. To make a spike possible, one of the first two hits must be a "set", which is hitting the ball in a gentle arc that puts it in the right spot for a "spike". Then the spiker times his jump to be there and spike it down. When good teams are playing, almost half of the net crossings are spikes.

    Players "block" by jumping up near the net, where the ball is going to be when it is spiked, and holding both hands up and over the net, hoping that the spiked ball will hit their hands and bounce back, instead of coming over the net.

    Jet Nai Heed : The act of intentionally blocking a spike from the opposing team.

    That's a volleyball jargon ... but, every block has that intention. Can somebody provide further explanation? :confused:
    Every attempted block of a spike does have that intention. But I see players block non-spikes as well, when they can.

    I think you are assuming too much. The word "intentionally" being there does not mean that this term is used to distinguish between "intentional" and "unintentional".

    You also assume that "blocking" means the same as "attempting to block". It does not. If I remember games I have seen, only about 1/3 of "attempted blocks" succeed. The definition says this term is used for blocking a spike, not for attempting to block a spike. So this seems to be a word used for a successful block, of a spike.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It doesn't sound like English, even. Dutch maybe, or Afrikaans?
    This should get this thread closed:

    Google Translate sees "jet nai" as Japanese (based on pronunciation?) for "cannot be helped." I wonder if the meaning shouldn't be
    Jet Nai Heed : The act of unintentionally blocking a spike from the opposing team.
    ("Jet Nai Heed" is not recognized by Google Translate.)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I had a similar reaction, I think, to srk: that "jet nai heed" doesn't ring true - it seems out of kilter with the other volleyball slang terms listed in the Wiki article.

    Is there anyone here that uses it?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A volleyball spike is like a tennis overhead slam: it is hitting the ball in a downward direction over the net so that it lands inside the opponenents court. And hitting it as hard as possible. If the other team fails to keep the ball from touching the ground (inside their court) they lose the point.
    Thanks! :) Even the glossary at the OP's link assumed everyone knew this.
     

    ManOfWords

    Senior Member
    Português [Brasil]
    This should get this thread closed:

    Google Translate sees "jet nai" as Japanese (based on pronunciation?) for "cannot be helped." I wonder if the meaning shouldn't be


    ("Jet Nai Heed" is not recognized by Google Translate.)
    why get it closed? for being a foreign word (maybe USED BY English speakers?!) that's why I posted it here, to see if it is legit or not.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I don't see any need to close the thread, ManOfWords.

    But, like you, I'm wondering whether "Jet Nai Heed" is legit.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The jet and heed are not Japanese, however. Google tries but doesn’t always get it all right:D
    I know. It's worse than I am.

    After some poking around, I'm convinced that it sees "jet nai" as "Ji ~e t nai," which sounds something like it looks, and translates as "can not be helped."

    I would understand an unintentional block as getting hit by the spike, rather than reacting to it.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I know. It's worse than I am.

    After some poking around, I'm convinced that it sees "jet nai" as "Ji ~e t nai," which sounds something like it looks, and translates as "can not be helped."
    Yup , it’s the nai confusing Google. The kana for e in your link is a small one which is not used in Japanese words. A full-sized one gives a translation of “I do not know” :eek: but when I create a link to it, Google makes the e small again! Also, Japanese doesn’t have a character for t outside of syllables with a vowel (such as ta te and to etc) so it’s definitely not Japanese.
     
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    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hmmm. I played a fair bit of volleyball and I wouldn't recognize most of those terms on that list, especially the slang terms.

    But the definition doesn't make sense to me...

    Jet Nai Heed : The act of intentionally blocking a spike from the opposing team.
    ...as opposed to...accidentally...blocking a spike? :confused::confused:

    When would you not at least try to "intentionally" block a spike?:rolleyes:
     
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