Jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut.

< Previous | Next >
Is the following inversion of the sentence correct?


Das wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?

Ja, jetzt bestimmt gut das wetter.



Here is another one.



Das wetter war auch am mittwoch gut, nicht?

Ja, auch am Mittwoch gut war das wetter.




Thanks.
 
  • Lykurg

    Senior Member
    German
    Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?

    Ja, jetzt bestimmt gut das Wetter. :cross:
    Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut.

    Here is another one.

    Das Wetter war auch am Mittwoch gut, nicht?

    Ja, auch am Mittwoch gut war das Wetter. :cross:
    Ja, auch am Mittwoch war das Wetter gut.
    Please remember to capitalize the nouns! It is a superfluous mistake not to do so. :)
     
    I originally used the sentence, "Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?" When it inverts it is going to do so behind the finite verb "Bleibt" because it must be in second position. Therefore it took "Jetzt" and moved it to the front of the sentence. Das Wetter is the noun so it moved to the end. What I do not understand is why did "bestimmt" (adv) and "gut" (adj) go at the end? Jetzt was an adverb. Is there a rule to follow?

    Further following this pattern I am assuming that the sentence, "Das Wetter war auch am Mittwoch gut, nicht?" the same thing happened. The inversion, "Ja, auch am Mittwoch war das Wetter gut," seems to imply that, "am Mittwoch" is a preposition and must follow the adverb "auch." Is this because "am" is a preposition?

    I am trying to understand between these two examples the placement of, "bestimmt" and "gut" and "am Mittwoch" as prepositions and adverbs and adjectives aside from the general rules for the inversion (this rule is that the finite verb is in second position no matter what happens and that when something other than the main noun preceeds it then the main noun will come after it).

    Thanks.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    I will try to analyze the sentences Lykurg and I used:

    red = subject (nominative)
    blue = predicate
    green = adverbs
    pink = obligatory addition to the predicate

    Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?

    Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut.
    The nominative is usually the first part of a sentence. If the subject shouldn't be first, an object or an adverb has to introduce a sentence before the predicate, because the predicate is always second in a sentence. There are exceptions (interrogative clauses, emphasis on the verb, special adverbial clauses, ...)

    The adverbs "jetzt" and "bestimmt" can be positioned wherever you want to, but never between the subject and the predicate (this is possible and fine in English, but wrong in German and French). Again, there are exceptions (persönlich, für meinen Teil, ...).

    "Gut" is the obligatory addition that the verb "bleiben" requires. "Ich bleibe" in itself doesn't make much sense without context. The same goes for "Ich bin" and "Ich habe." They always need something to be added, for example an object or a predicative adjective (in your sentence: gut).

    Words like "ja" or "nicht" can be left out and therefore are not important when you count the parts of the sentence. Let me take your second example to parse it:

    Das Wetter war auch am Mittwoch gut, nicht?

    Ja, auch am Mittwoch war das Wetter gut.
    for the first sentence:
    1. Das Wetter = subject (usually first in a sentence)
    2. war = predicate (which requires an addition like 'bleiben') (always second in a sentence)
    3. auch am Mittwoch = some additions (adverbs, comments, appositions, ...)
    4. gut = obligatory addition to the predicate (if it is a noun, it is called a predicate noun, if it an adjective, it may most likely be called a predicate adjective, ...)

    for the second sentence:
    1. auch am Mittwoch = some additions to the sentence (like number 3 above)
    2. war = predicate (always second)
    3. das Wetter = subject (needs to be juxtaposed to the verb, and since it can't precede the verb without violating the grammar rules, it has to be put after it)
    4. gut = predicate adjective (it usually gets kicked to the end of the sentence, but this is not a general rule)

    Just to show you that word order is not as strict as in English or French, I'll list some alternatives for your first sentences here:

    Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht? (emphasis on jetzt' - kind of neutral)
    Das Wetter bleibt bestimmt gut jetzt, nicht? (emphasis on 'gut')
    Jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut, nicht? (extra emphasis on 'jetzt')
    Bestimmt bleibt das Wetter jetzt gut, nicht? (extra emphasis on 'bestimmt')
    Gut bleibt das Wetter jetzt bestimmt, nicht? (extra emphasis on 'gut')
    Das Wetter bleibt bestimmt jetzt gut, nicht? (emphasis on 'bestimmt')
     
    Would it be correct to write the reply to, "Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?" as "Ja, jetzt bestimmt bleibt gut," instead of, "Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut."

    Is there a reason why you cannot keep jetzt and bestimmt together?

    Here is another one. "Ja, gestern Heiß war das Wetter."

    Is this grammatically correct?

    Thanks.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Would it be correct to write the reply to, "Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?" as "Ja, jetzt bestimmt bleibt gut," instead of, "Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut."
    Sounds fine.
    Is there a reason why you cannot keep jetzt and bestimmt together?
    Not to my knowledge.
    Here is another one. "Ja, gestern heiß war das Wetter."

    Is this grammatically correct?
    No, it breaks an iron law - the verb has to come second. Try again. :)

    Jana
     

    Lykurg

    Senior Member
    German
    bluetoonwithcarrotandnail said:
    Would it be correct to write the reply to, "Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?" as "Ja, jetzt bestimmt bleibt gut," instead of, "Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut."
    Sounds fine.
    I disagree, the 'iron rule' is broken again - and the subject (es / das Wetter) is missing.
     
    I am sorry; I missed the key sentence!

    Jana

    The original sentence is, "Das Wetter bleibt jetzt bestimmt gut, nicht?" It needs to be inverted around the verb "bleibt" (by inversion I mean the finite verb stays in the same place and the subject goes on the other side). "Jetzt" obviously goes to the beginning as the start of the sentence. Can "bestimmit" go with it? Are both of these following two combinations possible as inversions (these inversions are replies)?



    I. "Ja, jetzt bestimmt bleibt gut."
    II. "Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut."


    If number one is wrong because, "jetzt bestimmt" is not allowed by the iron rule is there a short way of explaining this for somebody on the level of german one?

    Thanks.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    I. "Ja, jetzt bestimmt bleibt gut." :cross:
    II. "Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut." :tick:

    If number one is wrong because, "jetzt bestimmt" is not allowed by the iron rule is there a short way of explaining this for somebody on the level of german one?
    a) Well, the rule says the verb goes in second position.
    b) "jetzt" and "bestimmt" do not belong to the same idea, but are two items.
    c) Thus, in I. the verb is in third position. That is wrong.

    Please note, that interjections like "Ja," do not count.

    Kajjo
     
    I. "Ja, jetzt bestimmt bleibt gut." :cross:
    II. "Ja, jetzt bleibt das Wetter bestimmt gut." :tick:

    c) Thus, in I. the verb is in third position. That is wrong.
    You said that there must always be a verb in second position. That is why bestimmt is wrong. It is in the second position. If this is true then why is the following sentence correct, "In Deutschland ist der Summer anders." This would make "ist" be in third position because of the word "In". Unless "In" does not count like "Ja."

    Thanks.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Right, the counting is difficult. Please note that "second position" does not mean "second word". That would be simple and clear. Unfortunately, it is not.

    Position means "idea" or "functional part of the sentence".

    "in Deutschland" = Präpositionalobjekt (eine Idee!)
    (genauso: Durch den Orkan, Aufgrund des schlechten Wetters, Nach Klärung der genauen Umstände, ... the number of words does not count, just the number of ideas!)

    Kajjo
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Noch ein Beispiel:

    Subjekt Prädikat Objekt
    Das Deutschforum hilft Schülern.
    Das neue Deutschforum hilft Schülern.
    Das neue Deutschforum von World-Reference hilft Schülern.
    Das neue Deutschforum, das kürzlich eingeführt wurde, hilft Schülern.

    Die Zählweise und Subjektbezeichnung betrifft nur die Bestimmung der "zweiten Position". Innerhalb der hier rot gekennzeichneten Phrasen kann man natürlich wiederum funktionale Bestimmungen vornehmen:

    Das = Artikel zu Deutschforum
    neue = Attribut zu Deutschforum
    das kürzlich eingeführt wurde = Nebensatz zu Deutschforum

    Kajjo
     
    I didnt have this up there correct before.

    Das Wetter war gestern heiß, nicht?

    The inversion would be.

    Ja, gestern war heiß das Wetter.




    I have another quesiton. It is about the inversion "Das Wetter war auch am Mittwoch gut, nicht?" which becomes, "
    Ja, auch am Mittwoch war das Wetter gut." Why does "am Mittwoch" go with "auch" which should be putting it in second position?

    Thanks.

     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Das Wetter war gestern heiß, nicht?:tick:
    Ja, gestern war heiß das Wetter.:cross:
    Ja, gestern war das Wetter heiß.:tick:

    Beachte, daß das "war" an der richtigen Position stand, aber bei getrennten Verben die zweite Hälfte ganz hinten folgt.

    I have another quesiton. It is about the inversion "Das Wetter war auch am Mittwoch gut, nicht?" which becomes, "Ja, auch am Mittwoch war das Wetter gut." Why does "am Mittwoch" go with "auch" which should be putting it in second position?
    "auch am Mittwoch" ist offensichtlich für Deutsche eine Idee. Das "auch" bezieht sich auf "am Mittwoch", nicht auf "gut sein". Daher bilden die drei Wörter ein Satzglied.

    Kajjo
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Ja, auch am Mittwoch war das Wetter gut."
    "auch am Mittwoch" ist offensichtlich für Deutsche eine Idee.
    Ja. es ist eine Idee und sie besteht aus zwei Teilen (auch) und (am Mittwoch)

    (Ja-0), ((auch 1.1) am Mittwoch-1.2) (war - 2) (das Wetter-3) gut.

    Man kann grammatisch richtig auch sagen:

    Ja, am Mittwoch war das Wetter auch gut. (... nicht nur am Montag und Dienstag) (hier würde "auch" zum Verb gehören - ((auch gut) sein) oder (auch (gut sein)).

    Das wäre die entsprechende Antwort zu:

    "Das Wetter war am Mittwoch auch gut, nicht?"

    Auf
    "War das Wetter am Mittwoch gut?"
    ist die richtige Antwort:
    "Ja, das Wetter war am Mittwoch gut."

    Man kann aber auch sagen:
    Ja, am Mittwoch war das Wetter auch gut. (erweitert die Frage)

    Grüße von Bernd
     
    This is the last question I have to ask. It is different than the other examples because it does not begin with "Das."
    This one begins with, "Es ist." This is a statement and is not a question.

    Es ist hoffenlicht warm.

    Inversion

    Hoffenlicht ist es warm.


    Is this correct?

    Thanks.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Beachte, daß das "war" an der richtigen Position stand, aber bei getrennten Verben die zweite Hälfte ganz hinten folgt.
    That's not entirely correct, Kajjo. ;)

    The verb "sein" does not have a "second part." I guess you are referring to the old rule of the separable prefix of the "sein," like "absein" (now: ab sein) or "seinlassen" (now: sein lassen).

    We should better call the verb "sein" a copula like "bleiben" and "werden," as I explained above, because we can't consider it real verbs, since they don't carry an idea that can stand alond. In English, "I am" doesn't make much sense without any context either. Questions like "what?," "where?," or "who?" remain.

    Bluetoon, you have to remember that the German copula is formed like this:

    subject + copula + (adverbials) + predicate noun/adjective
    Der Mann war gestern Morgen sehr müde.

    Modals and auxiliaries behave exactly the same as copulas (copulae?):
    subject + modal verb + (adverbials) + infinitive
    Die Frau muss bestimmt bald nach Hause gehen.

    A German sentence consists of at least a subject and a predicate. If there's a copula, auxiliary, or a modal verb, you must know that there's always a second part of them. This is the usual pattern of a normal sentence in German:

    subject + predicate

    If there are additional things that have to be mentioned, they usually go after the predicate (= object):

    subject + predicate + object (SPO)/adverbial expression

    If the predicate consists of more than just one word (copulas, verbs with separable prefixes, auxiliaries, ...), they usually come last in your sentence:

    subject + predicate + object + 2nd verb/adjective (something that belongs to the predicate)

    The last thing could be compared to:

    He picked me up (at the station).
    subject + verb + object + 2nd part of the verb (+ adverbial expression)
    Er holte mich (am Bahnhof) ab.
    subject + verb + object (+ adverbial expression) + 2nd part of the verb

    I hope it helps a bit. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top