jewish circumsicion [ circumcision ]

rojogozu

Member
Español - Costa Rica
Hello,

Can somebody tell me what is a popular term for the jewish circumsicion or its celebration? I thought I'd heard it. It begins with a 'b'.

Thank you.
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think you're speaking of a Yiddish or Hebrew word that is commonly used in English. It's called a "briss" in my area of the US. You can find this word in the WR dictionary.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Pronunciation note:

    Most Jews in the US are of Ashkenazi descent, for whom the traditional pronunciation would be bris. However, those of Sephardic descent use the pronunciation brit. It is, however, the same Hebrew word that has come to be used in English. I wouldn't call it a "popular" term, so much as a technical one.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It actually comes up in conversation from time to time, as in "I won't be available Tuesday night. It's my son's bris." I don't know if it's correct to use it in this way, but in my area (Los Angeles) the word is used for the celebration, not just the technical operation.
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    James you are quite correct. Bris refers to not only the ceremony but usually includes the party or gathering that follows. I haven't been to one for decades, but it used to be a very quiet affair with just a few friends. I believe thay have become rather more extravagant.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    When I said "technical term" I meant specialized vocabulary, as opposed to slang. Sorry for not being clear.

    I'll try to stay out of a discussion better suited to the Hebrew forum, and just say that bris (brit) is not the technical operation. When used in English it refers to the ceremony and the celebration, as James and gasman so correctly pointed out.

    I'm sorry for confusing matters.
     

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Pronunciation note:

    Most Jews in the US are of Ashkenazi descent, for whom the traditional pronunciation would be bris. However, those of Sephardic descent use the pronunciation brit.
    Are you simply distinguishing between bris and brit, or you giving the pronunciation? Because my understanding was that it's pronounced "briss".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    From the perspective of a complete outsider this thread is confusing.
    Having looked around, I see that some refer to this event using a word that is written in English with an s at the end. I presume they pronounce this word with an s at the end.
    I see that some refer to this event using a word that is written in English with a t at the end. I presume they pronounce this word with a t at the end.

    Both English representations are, of course, a representation of the pronunciation of a non-English word. Whether it is the same word or not is irrelevant.

    If I see the word bris, I will pronounce it with s at the end, not t.
    If I see the word brit, I will pronounce it with t at the end, not s.

    You may spell it as you see fit, but please do not ask me to pronounce a word written bris as if it had t at the end, or vice versa.
     

    ahshav

    Senior Member
    English, Hebrew
    Are you simply distinguishing between bris and brit, or you giving the pronunciation? Because my understanding was that it's pronounced "briss".
    It's a difference in pronunciation, not ritual. The word is pronounced differently by different people.

    Bris - by people of Ashkenazi (European - except southern) descent.
    Brit - by people of Sephardi (southern European, Middle East and N. African) descent, as well as Israelis
     

    ahshav

    Senior Member
    English, Hebrew
    From the perspective of a complete outsider this thread is confusing.
    Having looked around, I see that some refer to this event using a word that is written in English with an s at the end. I presume they pronounce this word with an s at the end.
    I see that some refer to this event using a word that is written in English with a t at the end. I presume they pronounce this word with a t at the end.

    Both English representations are, of course, a representation of the pronunciation of a non-English word. Whether it is the same word or not is irrelevant.

    If I see the word bris, I will pronounce it with s at the end, not t.
    If I see the word brit, I will pronounce it with t at the end, not s.

    You may spell it as you see fit, but please do not ask me to pronounce a word written bris as if it had t at the end, or vice versa.
    the word is ברית - in with the last letter is pronounced as either an "s" or a "t" (see above). Depending on who writes the word (in English transliteration) - the word will be spelled either "bris" or "brit."
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    And just because I don't see it mentioned, "brit" is not pronounced like the brit in Britain, but is closer to breet to rhyme with street.
    The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary has an entry for a synonym for bris which is written Brit Milah (capitalized thus). It gives the pronunciation of the i in the first word as the i in it and the i in the second word as the ee in see.

    The entry contains a variant Brith Milah, which has three pronunciations, all of which have the first vowel with the i in it.
     

    Scribblerr

    Senior Member
    English US
    Brit milah is spelled בְרִיתמִילָה in Hebrew. The resh has a single dot under it, which is the "ee" vowel sound. It is pronounced "breet meelah." Ashkenazi Jews often spell it "bris" and pronounce it "briss." But spelled with a T, you hear a long e sound every time. I have absolutely no idea why they would capitalize it. There are no capital letters as we know them in Hebrew, and this is not a proper noun.
     
    Last edited:

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Moderator note: This is starting to look increasingly like the Hebrew forum rather than the English Only one ...
     
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