Jij gaat heeel ver schoppen in het koelvak

motorhead

Senior Member
Italian
Hello , can someone help me with this:
Jij gaat heeel ver schoppen in het koelvak


Mybe it sounds like "you must heal and kick they".
I don't know if there is a vulgar content , so sorry if it is and I'll delete in immediatly.
 
  • jippie

    Senior Member
    Dutch living in Mexico
    Hello , can someone help me with this:
    Jij gaat heeel ver schoppen in het koelvak


    Mybe it sounds like "you must heal and kick they".
    I don't know if there is a vulgar content , so sorry if it is and I'll delete in immediatly.
    They probably mean: 'Jij gaat het heel ver schoppen in het koelvak' = you will get very far (in the sense of 'you will be very successful') in the profession of cooling.... Doesn't make much sense to me, but I would need more context to think of something else.

    'Ver schoppen' can also have the literal meaning of 'kick far', a ball for example. But that makes even less sense here.

    Sorry I can't be more helpful, maybe some of the other Dutch are more creative?
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    'Je gaat heel ver' means something like 'you go too far' or 'you're going overboard' or 'you're being very extreme' (I can't think of a really good colloquial English equivalent) and 'het koelvak' is a cooling compartment. It still doesn't make a lot of sense unless the context is that of someone being reprimanded for playing football in a walk-in 'fridge.
     

    Joannes

    Senior Member
    Belgian Dutch
    One's being creative with the language, no doubt about that. The sentence literally makes no sense at all.

    I'm inclined to combine both given views. :) I would guess the speaker meant je gaat het heel ver schoppen, 'you're going to make it, go far (in the world)'. I would not analyse the vak part as 'profession' though, I agree with Suehill's 'cooling compartment'. But note that koelvak could also mean - but not quite common - the part of a supermarket where products that need to be cooled are stored (I don't know an English equivalent).

    Now, does this make sense: 'you're really going to make it in the cooling compartment'? No, obviously it doesn't. We're in need of context, but I can think of contexts where the adressee could be said in a creative way to be kind of cold-hearted, or frigid.
     

    Freston

    Member
    Netherlands, Dutch
    I agree the original sentence is probably "Jij gaat het heel ver schoppen in het koelvak". It would not make any sense otherwise.

    I read this sentence as an insult. To show it, I'll divide it in it's parts first.

    "Jij gaat het heel ver schoppen" has two meanings:
    1) You are going to kick it far (=literal)
    2) You are going to reach distant goals (as in: a promising career, setting up a great business, that sort of thing)

    So this is the positive part

    "Koelvak", as in the "cooling compartment" in a supermarket for example. Having a job there is not a high status job.

    So saying "Jij gaat het heel ver schoppen in het koelvak" is like saying: "You'll be a great dish washer someday".

    BUT

    It could also be a threat. Because if they mean the cooling compartment in a morgue, it means you'll be a great corpse. Someone saying something like that has seen to many mafia movies.

    ---

    Both meanings reflect the negative attitude of the speaker, and it's not a sentence I'd say myself. But as far as translating goes, this is the best I could do. I hope it's helpful.
     

    Sakty

    Member
    Dutch, The Netherlands
    Isn't this from a commercial from Albert Hein?

    "jij gaat het het heel ver schoppen........,in het koelvak"

    If you ment from this commercial , then it is ment in a sarcastic way.
     
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