Jinetear dinero ajeno

  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    Hola, imorales, y bienvenido al foro.

    Sin saber de qué se trata, y sin ver un ejemplo concreto del uso de la frase, es difícil traducir un fragmento.

    Por favor, muéstranos la oración completa donde aparece la frase y danos algunos detalles de trasfondo.
     

    Alisterio

    Senior Member
    UK English
    At least in a Mexican context, the term "jinetear el dinero" is a set phrase. There's a previous thread on this here. It's not easy to translate: it means to delay payment to a creditor so that your money generates interest for you or, less specifically, to manipulate someone else's funds for your own profit.

    As fenixpollo says, we would need to see a complete sentence and some context to be able to provide you with a better translation.
     

    imorales135

    New Member
    Espanol
    Alisterio this is a very good explanation for "jinetear" and the question is, if there a phrase in English that can be used with the same meaning for example Juan esta jineteando mi sueldo.
    it means that Juan is handling my salary generating interests before he actualy pays me, does this makes sense? is there a word or phrase with the same meaning.
    Thanks for your help
     

    Alisterio

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In the specific context you mention, I think I would have to go with something like "Juan is paying me late so he can keep the interest for himself." I personally wouldn't understand "playing the float", although I don't doubt it's a common expression in the U.S.
     

    imorales135

    New Member
    Espanol
    Team: Thanks for your help all your comments have been very useful.
    Regards,
    Jovenes: Gracias por su apoyo todos sus comentarios han sido de gran ayuda.
    Saludos,
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    Perhaps "making money off the float" or "playing the float."
    I've never heard this expression. Is it a gambling term? Or maybe stockbroking?

    I agree with Alisterio that the phrase "Juan está jineteando mi sueldo" isn't easy to translate in a way that most people understand. You'd probably have to explain it, as Alisterio suggests.
     

    tonguingaround

    Banned
    Spanish Argentina
    In Argentina we say "bicicletear" instead of "jinetear". It seems in Mexico people ride horses whereas in Argentina we ride bikes to mean the same (surprisingly we have this gaucho tradition in Argentina so we should be the ones riding horses)


    "Bicicletear" literally means "to bicycle" but on the it street means to put off paying someone for the longest amount of time possible, an art perfected by generations of Argentines that is now being put to good use by the our government.

    Hope it helps
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I've never heard this expression. Is it a gambling term? Or maybe stockbroking?
    [...]

    It's a banking term (or perhaps a criminal justice term applied to banking). The original meaning is quite specific and refers to certain illegal practices, but it's been extended a bit to refer to any form of financial arrangement in which the holder of someone elses's money is able to profit off the possession of it before turning the principle over to the rightful owner. Thus if you transfer funds to someone via a bank and the bank uses the money to engage in speculation with it before making it available to the recipient, the bank's action is sometimes (loosely) called "playing the float."

    There's more info in the Wikipedia article on check-kiting.
     

    Alisterio

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's a banking term (or perhaps a criminal justice term applied to banking). The original meaning is quite specific and refers to certain illegal practices, but it's been extended a bit to refer to any form of financial arrangement in which the holder of someone elses's money is able to profit off the possession of it before turning the principle over to the rightful owner. Thus if you transfer funds to someone via a bank and the bank uses the money to engage in speculation with it before making it available to the recipient, the bank's action is sometimes (loosely) called "playing the float."

    There's more info in the Wikipedia article on check-kiting.

    imorales135, I don't think you're going to get a more perfect translation than this. Congratulations to The Newt! It's a shame the expression is not a bit better known in the wider English-speaking world, but I'm certainly going to start using it!
     
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