jingle my change

stargazer

Senior Member
Slovenia, Slovenian
Hello everyone

I was wondering if the expression "to jingle one's change" implies something else beside its actual meaning? I came across a sentence: "I almost bought Little Birds and Henry and June but decided to jingle my loose change elsewhere."
Another instance is: "He jingled the change in his pocket incessantly, and when he took his jacket off, there were big, nasty sweat marks on his underarms." Does his jingling imply that he was a man lacking any social graces? This took place at a dinner party in a fancy house with fancy guests.
Thanks for your answers! :)
 
  • MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    "I almost bought Little Birds and Henry and June but decided to jingle my loose change elsewhere."

    This seems to mean that the speaker was about to buy these two books; but then decided to spend his money elsewhere. (You might jingle the change in your pocket before buying something.)

    "He jingled the change in his pocket incessantly, and when he took his jacket off, there were big, nasty sweat marks on his underarms."

    Both the change-jingling and the sweating underarms seem to signify nervousness.

    MrP
     

    stargazer

    Senior Member
    Slovenia, Slovenian
    MrPedantic said:
    "I almost bought Little Birds and Henry and June but decided to jingle my loose change elsewhere."

    This seems to mean that the speaker was about to buy these two books; but then decided to spend his money elsewhere. (You might jingle the change in your pocket before buying something.)

    "He jingled the change in his pocket incessantly, and when he took his jacket off, there were big, nasty sweat marks on his underarms."

    Both the change-jingling and the sweating underarms seem to signify nervousness.

    MrP
    Oh, thanks. Somehow this has never occurred to me :)
     
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