jocose, jocular, jocund, jovial, jolly

celine713

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, everybody!
How do you use these farmiliar words as follows?

jocose, jocular, jocund, jovial, jolly

the examples are made by myself:

The jocose man made us burst out laughing
she has a jocular/jocund/jovial/jolly temprament.

I feel that "jocose"only alludes to "someone/ something (?)'s ability to make others merry.which is equal to humourous, while all the others refer to " someone being happy and lighthearted in nature".

Any ideas are welcomed!
 
  • Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Hi, everybody!
    How do you use the familiar words that follow?

    jocose, jocular, jocund, jovial, jolly

    I made these examples by myself:

    The jocose man made us burst out laughing
    she has a jocular/jocund/jovial/jolly temprament.

    I feel that "jocose"only alludes to "someone/ something (?)'s ability to make others merry.which is equal to humourous, while all the others refer to " someone being happy and lighthearted in nature".

    Any ideas are welcomed!
    I must admit that I was tempted to change "farmiliar" to "unfamiliar" because of the apprent esoteric quality of the word "jocose." I honestly have never used the word "jocose" used outside of a dictionary reading and the word "jocular" only rarely in speech, so that might give you a clue as to its frequency of use. Jovial and jolly are slightly more used, but not by much. Jolly is a bit of an antiquated phrase and you would only use it to refer to a Santa Claus-type figure who is always good-spirited. It can also be used derogatively for an overweight person, but only in the right context. I personally only really use "jovial" when referring to someone's manner. I will say, "He has a certain jovial manner about him," also meaning good-spirited and fun (though not necessarily funny!).

    Remember, these opinions come from a American. The British, or others, might still use some of these words that Americans don't often use.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I must admit that I was tempted to change "farmiliar" to "unfamiliar" because of the apprent esoteric quality of the word "jocose." I honestly have never used the word "jocose" used outside of a dictionary reading and the word "jocular" only rarely in speech, so that might give you a clue as to its frequency of use. Jovial and jolly are slightly more used, but not by much. Jolly is a bit of an antiquated phrase and you would only use it to refer to a Santa Claus-type figure who is always good-spirited. It can also be used derogatively for an overweight person, but only in the right context. I personally only really use "jovial" when referring to someone's manner. I will say, "He has a certain jovial manner about him," also meaning good-spirited and fun (though not necessarily funny!).

    Remember, these opinions come from a American. The British, or others, might still use some of these words that Americans don't often use.
    I absolutely second what you've said, Hockey13. I have never heard the word "jocose" used and the other words very, very rarely. They all seem to have a "quaint" sound and/or connotation.
     
    I must admit that I was tempted to change "farmiliar" to "unfamiliar" because of the apprent esoteric quality of the word "jocose." I honestly have never used the word "jocose" used outside of a dictionary reading and the word "jocular" only rarely in speech, so that might give you a clue as to its frequency of use. Jovial and jolly are slightly more used, but not by much. Jolly is a bit of an antiquated phrase and you would only use it to refer to a Santa Claus-type figure who is always good-spirited. It can also be used derogatively for an overweight person, but only in the right context. I personally only really use "jovial" when referring to someone's manner. I will say, "He has a certain jovial manner about him," also meaning good-spirited and fun (though not necessarily funny!).

    Remember, these opinions come from a American. The British, or others, might still use some of these words that Americans don't often use.



    I agree with Hockey13. In BE these words are very archaic and not used in conversation.

    At Christmas one will see "jolly" on vintage-style Christmas cards - usually with a picture of Santa Claus - "Wishing you a jolly Christmas."

    I collect antique post cards. I was very amused to read the message on one of them, which uses the word "jolly". "We are having a wonderful holiday at the seaside. The weather is perfect. See you when we get back. Just off for a jolly cup of tea!" :D

    Older people use the idiom "jolly dee" in a somewhat "sarcastic" way.

    "We're going to Aunty Ethel's for tea tomorrow."

    "Jolly dee!" (what fun!)

    In other words, tea with Aunty Ethel isn't really such a special occasion.

    "Jolly hockey sticks!" is another idiom, used in somewhat the same way, as is "Whacko!"






    LRV
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Well, I must be an old relic even by BE standards-- except for jocund, I use all of these words, whether in writing or speech.

    Jocose to me means light and prone to laughter by nature (as opposed to behavior that's a matter of style). It isn't so much "joke" related and doesn't mean telling them or even being witty-- playfulness is more the quality. If you are entertained by a jocose person it's because his/her attitude is contagions, and you get it more by osmosis than by a deliberate effort.

    Jocular means something like facetious, but it's a more easygoing attitude-- facetious people can be jocular, but they also "target" objects of mild ridicule. A jocular person is always playing with language, and has a pretty high nonsense quotient. Jocular behavior can be deliberately witty, though. Jocularity is also something alcohol can bring out of a person with verbal facility.

    Jovial is very close to jolly, and a similar distinction exists as the one between jocose and jocular. Jollity is more spontaneous or congenital, and joviality more a matter of style. Jolly people are happy, jovial people good-natured-- again, the one is personal and the other involves others in the role of listeners or onlookers.

    I don't use jocund because it has too specific a connection with the Mona Lisa, whose image doesn't exemplify gaiety or levity to me. It's one of those French and/or Italian words I think of as too firmly "owned' by those languages to use with ease as an AE word.

    I'm surprised so many people think of them as "exotic." Does that include noun forms like jocosity and joviality?
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    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Joviality doesn't miff me, though I would only expect to hear it in joking form...like if someone was trying to find different synonyms...

    "He's got about him a certain spunk, a happiness, a good nature, a....um....joviality!"

    Jocosity would sound practically foreign to me.
     

    celine713

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Haha, three friends from three different areas think so much alike! Wow, that is really out of my expectation, though I feel relieved since Foxfirebrand still uses them! I want to ask all of you, if you donot use these words, what other alternatives can it be? Thanks a lot!
     

    celine713

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Well, I must be an old relic even by BE standards-- except for jocund, I use all of these words, whether in writing or speech.

    Jocose to me means light and prone to laughter by nature (as opposed to behavior that's a matter of style). It isn't so much "joke" related and doesn't mean telling them or even being witty-- playfulness is more the quality. If you are entertained by a jocose person it's because his/her attitude is contagions, and you get it more by osmosis than by a deliberate effort.

    Jocular means something like facetious, but it's a more easygoing attitude-- facetious people can be jocular, but they also "target" objects of mild ridicule. A jocular person is always playing with language, and has a pretty high nonsense quotient. Jocular behavior can be deliberately witty, though. Jocularity is also something alcohol can bring out of a person with verbal facility.

    Jovial is very close to jolly, and a similar distinction exists as the one between jocose and jocular. Jollity is more spontaneous or congenital, and joviality more a matter of style. Jolly people are happy, jovial people good-natured-- again, the one is personal and the other involves others in the role of listeners or onlookers.

    I don't use jocund because it has too specific a connection with the Mona Lisa, whose image doesn't exemplify gaiety or levity to me. It's one of those French and/or Italian words I think of as too firmly "owned' by those languages to use with ease as an AE word.
    Why this word "jocund "reminds you of Mona Lisa? I am really curious about that! ^_^

    I'm surprised so many people think of them as "exotic." Does that include noun forms like jocosity and joviality?
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    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Haha, three friends from three different areas think so much alike! Wow, that is really out of my expectation, though I feel relieved since Foxfirebrand still use them! I want to ask all of you, if you donot use these words, what other alternatives can it be? Thanks a lot!
    Well if you want to sound natural, consider using a 2-dollar word instead of thumbing through the thesaurus! Or better yet, consider leaving the descriptive adjective out altogether as I think it is obvious that the man who made you burst out laughing was "jocose!" I would usually never make a double-describer sentence like that. I would probably find another way to describe the man as other than funny...such as old, tall, handsome, wisened, youthful, greying, etc. Then you can add more depth to him beside just as the funny man.

    "The charming man, who had just recently graduated from Harvard, made us all burst out laughing."
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    La Gioconda is the title of the painting we generally call "The Mona Lisa."

    As for using two-dollar words, I can guarantee you that my mind is a veritable blizzard of words, and one snowflake doesn't cost me appreciably more than another. Their differences are proverbial, of course, and it's hard not to indulge the sentiment that one of them is just right for the purpose you have every time you make a word choice.

    But my spoken language flows pretty freely, and I hope that "each snowflake is unique" imagery doesn't imply that I halt and falter and struggle for just the right word. Again, like the snowflake, it often just seems to fall into place, right where it belongs.

    Some people are that way with nuts and bolts, and even tools-- the one they grab first, without thinking, is just the one they need at the moment. They can fix a car with less effort than I'd use simply explaining the problem-- and not end up with leftover parts.
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