- Joe does it, only to lighten his heart.

Egoexpress

Senior Member
Hungary, Hungarian
Hi there,

Suppose regular Joe's been doing some voluntary work recently and he's asked why he does it.

I'm looking for a little sarcastic expression. I'd love to see a turn of phrase with the word "heart" in it. Let me try to make up one.

- Joe does it, only to lighten his heart.

There must be some catch in it for him, but he won't tell, maybe.

Hope it's clear enough.
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Hi there,

    Suppose regular Joe's been doing some voluntary work recently and he's asked why he does it.

    I'm looking for a little sarcastic expression. I'd love to see a turn of phrase with the word "heart" in it. Let me try to make up one.

    - Joe does it, only to lighten his heart.

    There must be some catch in it for him, but he won't tell, maybe.

    Hope it's clear enough.
    By "catch in it for him" do you mean "benefit in it for him"? From your context I suspect you do, but a "catch" is an unexpected draw-back - and so the opposite of that.
     

    miss sparkles

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Hi there,

    Suppose regular Joe's been doing some voluntary work recently and he's asked why he does it.

    I'm looking for a little sarcastic expression. I'd love to see a turn of phrase with the word "heart" in it. Let me try to make up one.

    - Joe does it, only to lighten his heart. This doesn't seem sarcastic...I don't know what you mean here.

    There must be some catch in it for him, but he won't tell, maybe. What do you mean here? You're looking for a sarcastic phrase using the word "heart"?

    Hope it's clear enough.
     
    Last edited:

    Egoexpress

    Senior Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    I think I misled you, please forget about what I've said. Let me break it down again.

    So there's this regular Joe who's been doing some voluntary work.


    You ask you friend why he does it and he says

    - He only wants to relieve\unburden his mind, he might have done a lot of bad things.

    How do they sound?
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Personally I do not understand miss sparkles's corrections above. "Voluntary work" and "a turn of phrase" are perfectly good English for me:confused:.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I think I misled you, please forget about what I've said. Let me break it down again.

    So there's this regular Joe who's been doing some voluntary work.


    You ask you friend why he does it and he says

    - He only wants to relieve\unburden his mind, he might have done a lot of bad things.

    How do they sound?
    I think the phrase you probably need is "he wants to cleanse his conscience."

    Edit - posted at the same time as the posts above - relieve his conscience is also good.
     

    Egoexpress

    Senior Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    Yeah, that sounds pretty well. Thank you Timpeac and Miss!

    Anyway is there a similar phrase but with a word "heart" in it?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The only expression with 'heart' that springs to mind is "he does it out of the goodness of his heart". But that has nothing to do with relieving a bad conscience: it means he does it because he is a good person.

    Like many a compliment, it can be used sarcastically, of course:)
     
    Last edited:
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