John Doe<,> of Union Street<,> won the lottery.

parsnips

Banned
Spanish - English
John Doe, of Union Street, won the lottery.

Should commas set off ‘of Union Street’?

Thank you.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, it works better with commas. Without commas it would read as if 'John Doe of Union Street' was the actual name/title of the person. In fact, you are just adding a little more information about John Doe (that he lives in Union Street).
     

    parsnips

    Banned
    Spanish - English
    Thanks, Chez.

    If a business or occupation was mentioned, should commas be used too?

    John Doe, of the New York State Police, resigned this afternoon.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Consider
    Philip Duke, of Edinburgh, crashed his car. -> A man called Philip Duke, who lives in Edinburgh, crashed his car.
    Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, crashed his car -> Philip, who is the Duke of Edinburgh, crashed his car.

    Commas are used to off-set non-defining phrases and clauses from the main clause. A non-defining phrase or clause can be omitted.
    If the phrases or clauses are defining then no comma is used and the phrase or clause cannot be omitted.

    At a basic level:
    The Duke, of Edinburgh, crashed his car. :cross:
    The Duke of Edinburgh crashed his car.:tick:
    Philip Duke, of Edinburgh, crashed his car. :tick:
    Philip Duke crashed his car. :tick:
     
    Last edited:

    parsnips

    Banned
    Spanish - English
    Thank you.

    If the ‘of’ phrase, then, falls at the end of the sentence, a comma would precede it as well, correct?

    Attending the conference will be John Doe, of Syracuse, New York.

    Thank you.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Back to your OP, yes.
    The lottery was won by John Doe, of Union Street.
    In that context/setting, the comma is not required.

    Your new question is complicated by the fact that Syracuse, New York already has a comma :D
     

    parsnips

    Banned
    Spanish - English
    Thanks again.

    So #2 below (with semicolons as well because of the internal elements) would be the way to go?

    1. Mike Smith of Joe's Bar and Grill, Pete Cummings of The Pasta Palace, and Kirby McFarland of Popeye's Chicken were given culinary awards.

    2. Mike Smith, of Joe's Bar and Grill; Pete Cummings, of The Pasta Palace; and Kirby, of Popeye's Chicken, were given culinary awards.

    Thanks
     

    parsnips

    Banned
    Spanish - English
    I think #1 above is clearer (and cleaner) with just the commas. #2 has too much punctuation going on with the semicolons.

    Do you agree?

    Thank you.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    1. Mike Smith of Joe's Bar and Grill, Pete Cummings of The Pasta Palace , (no comma necessary) and Kirby McFarland of Popeye's Chicken were given culinary awards.

    2. Mike Smith, of Joe's Bar and Grill; Pete Cummings, of The Pasta Palace; and Kirby, of Popeye's Chicken, were given culinary awards.:cross:
    2. is incorrectly punctuated. You don't need a comma after 'Mike Smith' and 'Kirby' and those semi-colons have no place there. 1. is fine if you remove the comma after 'Palace'.
     
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