Jordanian Arabic: معجوقين

raful

Senior Member
Hebrew
A few years ago a Jordanian band named Autostrad released a song called يا سلام
In it appear the following sentences
بس بدنا نعيش
ولو في تطنيش
معجوقين ع-الفاضي
زي الدراويش

What does معجوقين mean?
Somewhere online I read it might be معجوهين
Although I disagree I was wondering what does معجوهين mean.
 
  • elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    It's معجوقين (or معجوئين) and it means something like "excited." Yes, it's related to عجقة/عجئة.
     

    raful

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Thank you
    So what does -معجوقين ع-الفاضي mean: Excited over nothing? Excited by nothing?
     

    Tilmeedh

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    I learned (متشوّق) for 'excited' in Lebanese. Is this term used in Jordanian/Palestinian? How exactly does it differ from (معجوق)?

    Also, are there verbs (عجق) and/or (عجّق) in MSA or any Levantine dialect?

    *When it comes to this root, Almaany mentions only two nouns: (عَجَق) = 'bottleneck/constriction/crowding/(traffic) jam' and (عاجوقة) = 'dead men'.

    https://www.almaany.com/en/dict/ar-en/عجق/
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I wouldn’t translate معجوق as excited, it’s more like “busy” or “overwhelmed” or “in a hurry”.

    عجقة means: crowd or crowded, noisy, congestion, messy, entwined, twisted…etc.
    عجقة سير =traffic jam/ congestion
    شعر معجوق/معجّق = messy/un-combed hair
    شو هل عجقة هاي؟ = what’s this mess/ noise/ both?
    وسط البلد عجقة كتير = crowded

    I don’t see a relation with متشوّق - Lebanese, Palestinian, MSA, or otherwise.
    Please note that متشوّق itself is only an approximation to excited, it doesn’t actually mean excited.

    Also, are there verbs (عجق) and/or (عجّق) in MSA or any Levantine dialect?
    This is Levantine, I’m not sure there is an MSA root. It’s probably مولّدة.
     

    jack_1313

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    Just to reaffirm what Mahaodeh wrote, in Jordan the most common context in which I hear this word is أنا معجوق بالشغل, i.e. "I'm really busy with work". In the song lyrics quoted in the original post, I think the singer is saying that their lives are really busy and overwhelming but it's all for nothing, so to speak.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I wouldn’t translate معجوق as excited, it’s more like “busy” or “overwhelmed” or “in a hurry”.
    in Jordan the most common context in which I hear this word is أنا معجوق بالشغل, i.e. "I'm really busy with work".
    I can't speak for Jordanian Arabic. In Palestinian Arabic, in my experience (I'm familiar with the Jerusalem variety, Galilean varieties, and West Bank varieties), "excited" is absolutely the most common meaning. In fact, I don't even know if it's used in the other meanings you mention (if it is, it's rare and/or regional).

    If a child seems to be excited for no reason, you can say على إيش معجوق؟.
    Or, if they get super excited in anticipation of an event, you can say تنعجئش من هلأ.
    Or, let's say two people are having an argument and I recognize that a small part of what Person A is saying is right and they start fervently gloating about how right they are, I can say تنعجئش هلقدة، أنا بس قلت كذا وكذا
    Or, I could sardonically remark انعجأ to refer to their reaction.

    I may have made the mistake of assuming Jordanian and Palestinian used this word the same way. Although the two varieties are almost identical, there are differences, and this may be one of them.

    I learned (متشوّق) for 'excited' in Lebanese. Is this term used in Jordanian/Palestinian? How exactly does it differ from (معجوق)?
    متشوّق means "looking forward to." It's not really used in Palestinian Arabic except as an MSA import.

    Other than معجوق, there's also متحمس for "excited." They're not interchangeable.

    Also, are there verbs (عجق) and/or (عجّق) in MSA or any Levantine dialect?
    There's انعجق, "got excited," and عجّق, "got [someone else] excited."

    عجقة سير =traffic jam/ congestion
    شعر معجوق/معجّق = messy/un-combed hair
    شو هل عجقة هاي؟ = what’s this mess/ noise/ both?
    وسط البلد عجقة كتير = crowded
    For me, it works in the first and last examples: "crowdedness" is a common meaning of عجقة in Palestinian Arabic.

    I wouldn't use it in either of the other two examples.

    The "hair" one for me would be شعر مْكَرْكَب/مْبَرْبَش/مْكَنْفِش.
    "What's this mess?" would be شو هالفوضة/هالكركبة/هالبربشة؟, depending on the context.
    "What's this noise?" would be شو هالدَوْشة؟.
     

    jack_1313

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    I can't speak for Jordanian Arabic. In Palestinian Arabic, in my experience (I'm familiar with the Jerusalem variety, Galilean varieties, and West Bank varieties), "excited" is absolutely the most common meaning. In fact, I don't even know if it's used in the other meanings you mention (if it is, it's rare and/or regional).
    That's quite surprising given that Amman's population is mostly Palestinian.

    Living Arabic does mention the "busy" or "bustling" meaning, in the senses of both a place and a person, but flags it as Syrian Arabic.

    Edit: The direct link doesn't seem to work, so just search for the root عجق under Levantine. I don't know whether the other meaning - "excited" - is also used here.
     
    Last edited:

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    That's quite surprising given that Amman's population is mostly Palestinian.
    The Arabic spoken by Palestinians in Amman is not 100% identical to the Arabic spoken in Palestine. There are differences within Palestine itself, so why wouldn't there be differences between Amman and Palestine? In fact, it would be surprising if there weren't any differences.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Your link doesn't have an entry saying "excited," but the very last entry is similar:

    to be overly interested in or keen on (ب = s.th.); (انعجق بالشيء، اهتمّ به وبالغ في الحرص عليه)

    You can say الولد معجوق باللعبة to mean "The boy is excited/gung-ho about the toy."

    Let me also add that although I grew up in the Jerusalem area, I grew up speaking a mixture of Jerusalem(-influenced) Arabic and Galilean Arabic, since my parents are both from the Galilee (although my paternal grandfather was from Jerusalem). It's quite possible that the "excited" meaning is Galilean and that in Jerusalem the word is (also) used as in Amman. It's also possible that the "excited" meaning originated in the Galilee and then spread to Jerusalem, since many people (like my parents) have moved from the Galilee to Jerusalem and intermingled heavily with native Jerusalemites. Since Amman is not heavily exposed to other varieties of Palestinian Arabic, it makes sense that Amman Arabic would have developed differently from Jerusalem Arabic since the start of the Diaspora, now over 70 years ago (plenty of time for significant linguistic change to take place).

    A classic difference between Palestinian Arabic and Jordanian Arabic (including Amman) is the use of فاينة for "tissue" in the latter. This is derived from the brand name Fine, which is widespread in Jordan but not in Palestine (in fact, I don't even know if it's found in Palestine at all; I only know of it from Jordanian commercials on TV!). I remember my sister coming back from a trip to Amman and observing how strange it was to hear someone use فاينة for a tissue. In Palestinian Arabic, we use محرمة or كلينيكسة (from the brand name Kleenex).
     

    raamez

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Syria)
    Arabic sheen turns into jeem sometimes in Levantine Arabic i.e. عجق from عشق.
    Other examples:
    جعلك from شعلك على وزن شفعل
    جقم as in جقمه الجوع (he almost died of hunger)
    > شقم > سقم
     
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