jotter pad and jotting pad (AmE)

susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi,

I know in the UK jotting pads are also called "jotter pads." Is the same true of the US? Is "jotter pad" used at all? I searched in COCA with both "jotter pad" and "jotting pad" but found no results.

Thank you!
 
  • exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    Do you mean a notepad or scratchpad? A pad of empty pages bound at the top with glue, for taking notes, each page designed to be easily ripped off?

    The computer notepad you may be familiar with is a transferred usage of this word.
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've never come across 'jotting pad' in BE, and I don't think the term 'jotter pad' is used very much. 'Jotter' on its own might be used, though it sounds a little dated, but I'd say 'notepad' is the most common word.



    Cross-posted.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I'm with heypresto. Although I'd understand the terms, I don't remember hearing either jotting pad or jotter pad much (or at all?) in BrE. I have always said notepad.

    For me a jotter is (at least used to be: I haven't seen one for a long time) one of those big rectangular things you'd find on a desk — about 60cm x 40cm, usually with triangular corner retainers, into which you put a large sheet of paper. Such jotters were popular in the days of wooden (usually grained) desktops, as they provided a smooth surface for writing, as well as a handy place to jot odd notes or to doodle. Same thing as a desk blotter, but with ordinary paper instead of blotting paper.

    Ws:)
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I only remember desk planners that looked like the jotters you describe. I found one online and it's called a "desk planner blotter." I was surprised at the name, since it was no blotting paper, but I see online that blotter can be used to mean planner! The things you learn!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    My father used to say "jotting pad".

    We had a Parker T-Ball Jotter ball point pen, presumably for jotting notes on our jotting pad.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I only remember desk planners that looked like the jotters you describe. I found one online and it's called a "desk planner blotter." I was surprised at the name, since it was no blotting paper, but I see online that blotter can be used to mean planner! The things you learn!
    No blotter cannot be used to mean planner. A blotter is a device for holding blotting paper. If a similar device is being used to hold a planner, it is no longer a blotter, even if it is exactly the same piece of cardboard and fake leather. It is a planner. You might have found "desk planner blotter", but that just demonstrates how ineffective an internet search is at finding good use of English. What you should have found is "desk planner/blotter" - something which can be used for one of these purposes, but not both at the same time.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    And not only is a blotter for blotting, but a planner is for planning — whereas a jotter is for jotting. I never could understand the sense of a desk planner, as you have to move stuff off it every time you want to read it. But I did have a desk jotter many years ago: apart from its role as a smooth surface, its outer parts (top, bottom and both sides) were covered in jottings and doodles, and unlike a pad it was always at hand.

    Ws:)
     
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