Julie has any apple.

keeley_h

Senior Member
Bulgarian
Hi, everybody

'Any' is so tough for me.
Are the following sentences correct? What do they mean?

Julie has any apple.
Rose likes any juice.
Sally makes any wine.

I think all the sentences sound exaggerated or overblown and seems to be lies because nobody can 'has any kind/amount of apple' or 'can like any kind/amount of juice' or 'can make any kind/amount of wine'. So I think they are grammatically incorrect.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Rose seems to have a grammatical sentence: What kind of juice would Rose like? Rose likes any juice -- just offer her whatever you have on hand.

    And you changed your explanation of Sally from the example sentence to your explanation: Sally makes any wine doesn't make a lot of sense by itself, but if she's a good wine-maker, then Sally can make any kind of wine is fine.

    And if you want to put "kind of" in the sentence as you've done with Sally, then Julie has any kind of apple you want works for me if Julie is selling a variety of apples.

    My point is that you can't offer "any" in your example sentences and then expand that to "any kind of" or "any amount of" in your conclusions. When you do, then your conclusions are wrong.
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    Only the first one and maybe the third one sound questionable to me. The first one sounds like it is trying to say that Julie has any kind of apple you could think of (Gala, Fuji, Red Delicious, etc.). I see how you think they sound exaggerated but the second one I would just assume that Rose doesn't care what juice you give her because she doesn't dislike any of them.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, everybody

    'Any' is so tough for me.
    Are the following sentences correct? What do they mean?

    Julie has any apple.
    Rose likes any juice.
    Sally makes any wine.

    I think all the sentences sound exaggerated or overblown and seems to be lies because nobody can 'has any kind/amount of apple' or 'can like any kind/amount of juice' or 'can make any kind/amount of wine'. So I think they are grammatically incorrect.
    Your first example sounds strange to me. I'd write it this way:
    Julie has every kind of apple.
    If I were to use "any apple" in such a statement, I'd clarify it like this: Julie has any (kind of) apple you can think of.

    The second sentence sounds possible though slightly unusual. I think it means the same as this one:
    Rose likes any kind of juice.

    The third sentence reads as strangely as does the first one. I'd correct it similarly:
    Sally makes every type of wine.

    Even though two of the sentences sound pretty weird, they are possible but unlikely way of expressing the ideas above.
     
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