jump for something [=hurry out to buy something?]

nebt

Senior Member
Czech, CZ
When I say, I´ll just fetch flour from a shop and I´m right back, for example - May I use a verb equivalent to "jump" (for some flour) or something like that? I mean idiomatically.

And one more question:
I was driving back home when suddenly a deer jumped out of the forest right in front of my car.

- correct or not? Any other word for jumped (skipped, leaped out of the forest..)?

Thank you.
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I can't work jump into your first situation, unless whoever asked you to get the flour said something like,
    "Get me some flour and jump to it!"
    Which would mean go quickly (but with all due regard to the relevant health and safety guidelines and only if you have been trained to go quickly).

    The jumping deer sounds OK (grammatically, it may well have been killed if your car hit it, in which case it is far from OK). I think in the UK it would perhaps be more dramatic if the deer had leapt out of the forest (leaped in AE). To be a little more fantastic, it would have bounded.
     

    nebt

    Senior Member
    Czech, CZ
    I will jump to flour to the shop. - correct?

    to bound = rather a long giant and dramatic jump, isn´t it?
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    nebt said:
    I will jump to flour to the shop. - correct?:cross:

    to bound = rather a long giant and dramatic jump, isn´t it?:tick:
    The idiomatic "jump to it" can only be used as part of the instruction. It is equivalent to "Hurry up".

    You're right about bounding. If I read that a deer had bounded out of the forest, I would see it appear rather dramatically, in slow motion, in one long and graceful movement. I have a Springbok in mind - which is completely ridiculous as there aren't any here:)
     

    DaleC

    Senior Member
    nebt said:
    I will jump to flour to the shop. - correct?
    No, that's so incorrect I don't think any native has ever even thought of it. What you mean to say is 'dash (out)' or 'run (out)'. That's how we say informally that we're going to go somewhere on an errand and return, all as quickly as possible. Not 'jump', 'hop', or 'skip'.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    nebt said:
    And one more question:
    I was driving back home when suddenly a deer jumped out of the forest right in front of my car.
    Jumping jackrabbits! The forest appears to be right in front of your car.

    Try saying "Suddenly a deer jumped from/leapt from/bounded from the forest, landing/and landed right in front of my car.
     

    dayve

    Member
    English - Australia
    I would also suggest:

    I'll just duck out (to the store) to get some flour
    or
    I'll just dash out (to the store) to get even more flour

    You could equally use duck over to the store - and I'm sure there are a lot more expressions which mean similar things.
     

    DaleC

    Senior Member
    dayve said:
    I would also suggest:

    I'll just duck out (to the store) to get some flour
    or
    I'll just dash out (to the store) to get even more flour
    Yeah, I've heard 'duck out' too. Semantically, if 'duck' is used, then why not 'jump'? But 'jump' is not used.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    We wee boys used to skip too, although we tended to prefer to pretend we were horses, iirc.

    Meanwhile, back on topic, deer do "jump" out of forests.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Thank you maxiogee, for bringing the thread to order.
    For some reason, the concept of a deer ducking out of the forest in front of my car is a little too surreal for me.
     
    panjandrum said:
    Thank you maxiogee, for bringing the thread to order.
    For some reason, the concept of a deer ducking out of the forest in front of my car is a little too surreal for me.

    No, they definitely leap. Here is a road hazard sign which perfectly illustrates your vision of a Springbok, Panj. It says 'DEER XING' which I presume means 'deer crossing'. What a good way of saving paint!

    Is this an Irish road sign? :D



    La Reine V
     

    Borderer

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    I always tell my children that I'm nipping out to the shops to get something. (but really they know that I'll be ages, because I always stop to talk to people!!)
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    I am reminded, panjandrum, of the lovely Nor'n Irelandism, ducking and diving - I'd say a deer that was doing that as it came out of a forest onto a road was a deer with suicidal intent!
     
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