Just confirming vs. to be sure vs. to be clear

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jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
"Just confirming" or "To be sure" or "To be clear" that we will have a meeting at 11 o'clock this morning.


I think all of them are correct and just the latter two are more formal? Am I right? Thank you.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Just confirming that we will have a meeting at 11 o'clock this morning." is a complete, if informal, sentence. We often miss out the 'I'm' at the beginning of sentences like this.

    Whereas "To be sure (or "To be clear") that we will have a meeting at 11 o'clock this morning." isn't.

    You'd need to say something like 'I just want to make sure that . . . ', Or, 'Just to be clear, we have a meeting at 11, don't we?'
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    "Just confirming that we will have a meeting at 11 o'clock this morning." is a complete, if informal, sentence. We often miss out the 'I'm' at the beginning of sentences like this.

    Whereas "To be sure (or "To be clear") that we will have a meeting at 11 o'clock this morning." isn't.

    You'd need to say something like 'I just want to make sure that . . . ', Or, 'Just to be clear, we have a meeting at 11, don't we?'
    Thank you, heypresto.
    Do you mean “To be sure (or "To be clear") that we will have a meeting at 11 o'clock this morning.” is wrong? If so, why is it wrong? Thank you.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thank you, heypresto.
    Do you mean “To be sure (or "To be clear") that we will have a meeting at 11 o'clock this morning.” is wrong? If so, why is it wrong? Thank you.
    Because it's not a complete sentence. It's neither a question nor a statement, and it doesn't really mean anything.

    As I said above, you need to complete it by saying something like 'I want to be sure that . . . '. Or 'To be sure that we have a meeting at 11, I will come and get you at 10:55'.


    Cross-posted.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Because it's not a complete sentence. It's neither a question nor a statement, and it doesn't really mean anything.

    As I said above, you need to complete it by saying something like 'I want to be sure that . . . '. Or 'To be sure that we have a meeting at 11, I will come and get you at 10:55'.


    Cross-posted.
    Thank you, heypresto.
    Can I ask someone "To be sure/clear, do you know we will have a meeting at 11?"?
     
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