just experienced enough to be full of doubts

sisse nar

Senior Member
Korean
This is from "Adult World" by David F. Wallace.

"And yet,just experienced enough to be full of doubts (and of herself) at this innocent time, the young wife also believed that these irrational suspicions and obsessions could be merely her own youthful, self-centered Ego displacing its inadequacies and fears of true intimacy onto the innocent husband;"

I don't get what the underlined clause mean and how it relate to the next clause.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think we could use a bit more information about the actual context at this point in the narrative, sisse nar. What is bothering the wife?
     

    sisse nar

    Senior Member
    Korean
    "She felt herself becoming obsessed with the suspicion that her husband maybe took no genuine pleasure in their lovemaking together but was concentrated only on making her feel pleasure, forcing her to feel pleasure and passion; lying awake at night, she feared that he took some kind of twisted pleasure in imposing pleasure on her."

    This is the previous sentence.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Is the innocent time her relatively newly married status? She is innocent of sexual matters, but has had a little experience in life and sex. So her inexperience leads her to have doubts (spelled out in the preceding sentence). Her doubts are about what it is like for her husband and also about her own motivation. She seems to have a Freudian insight into what it is that might motivate her suspicions about her husband. The link between the two clauses is her insight into her suspicions.
     
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