justifiable remuneration for legitimate services rendered

< Previous | Next >

apoziopeza

Senior Member
slovak
Hi,


I am sure I understand what the underlined part of the sentence is linked to the beginning. Could you please help

thanks,

A.



Is there a procedure to ensure that compensation paid to agents and other intermediaries is appropriate and justifiable remuneration for legitimate services rendered?

Do I undestand it correctly? Please see brackets - Is there a procedure to ensure that compensation paid to agents and other intermediaries is appropriate and [that ] remuneration for legitimate services rendered [is justifiable]?

Source: Bribery and corruption risk assessment questionnaire
 
Last edited:
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I may have misunderstood this sentence, but I have my doubts about its grammaticality.

    Here's my guess at the author's intention:

    Is there a procedure to ensure that compensation paid to agents and other intermediaries is appropriate and (that) remuneration for legitimate services rendered (is) justifiable?

    (...which is very similar to yours, apoziopeza.)


    Is the writer a native speaker of English? Is this document in translation?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It looks perfectly grammatical to me, and I understand it rather differently from Beryl. I think Viknik has got it!

    Is there a procedure to ensure that X is Y?

    X = compensation [which is] paid to agents and other intermediaries

    Y = (appropriate and justifiable) remuneration for legitimate services rendered
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Sure, that's how I read it at first, but I began to have qualms about the pragmatic feasibility of such a reading - after all, compensation generally means something rather different from remuneration.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Allay your qualms! No dictionary worth its salt will fail to list remuneration as one of the definitions of compensation. WR dictionary doesn't, unfortunately, but in WR thesaurus R appears first in the list of synonyms for C.

    I suspect the author simply wanted to avoid using the same noun twice in one sentence. It might have been less linguistically contentious to have used "what is" instead of "compensation".
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'Compensation' is American business-speak for income or earnings.
    In the recent committal proceedings against Ariel Castro, his lawyer stated that he was receiving "unemployment compensation".
     
    Last edited:

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    it looks as Edinburgher noted that they have used "what is" instead of "compensation" (there a procedure to ensure that X is Y)

    perfect thanks, it makes sense!

    A.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    it looks as Edinburgher noted that they have used "what is" instead of "compensation" (there a procedure to ensure that X is Y)
    Correction: I did not note that they have used "what is", but that they could have done so, without changing the meaning I perceive, and without causing the clash between compensation and remuneration which Beryl perceives.

    Is there a procedure to ensure that what is paid to agents and other intermediaries is appropriate and justifiable remuneration for legitimate services rendered?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top