keep < abreast with / up to date with> current issues

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piano0011

Senior Member
Hokkien
Hey guys.

Can I say this sentence?

I have found the program to be very knowledgeable that even now, I am still watching the “Dr Phil” show in order to keep abreast with current mental health issues.

I think that would be the same as saying:

. I have found the program to be very knowledgeable that even now, I am still watching the “Dr Phil” show in order to keep up to date with current mental health issues.
 
  • piano0011

    Senior Member
    Hokkien
    Thanks for the kind reply. So I should say:

    I have found the program to be very knowledgeable that even now, I am still watching the “Dr Phil” show in order to keep abreast of current mental health issues.

    or

    I have found the program to be very knowledgeable that even now, I am still watching the “Dr Phil” show in order to keep to date with current mental health issues.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    These are both acceptable:
    I am still watching the “Dr Phil” show in order to keep abreast of current mental health issues.
    I am still watching the “Dr Phil” show in order to keep up to date with current mental health issues.
    [I might say 'up to date on' rather than 'with', though both are acceptable.]​

    I don't see a significant difference in meaning.
     
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