Keep one eye on books, keep another on practice

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Background: Xiao Ming is a high school student who is used to read lots of books, yet simply joining very few outdoor activities. So I give him an advice:

It is important to keep one eye on books, keep another on practice. Because critical thinking pattern is best acquired through solving problems of reality and managing human interactions.

I wonder whether "Keep one eye on books, keep another on practice" sounds idiomatic in English.

Source: English scenario making practice by me.
 
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  • NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    I meant "keep another eye on reality and making actual efforts to solve problems."

    But basically, my question is:

    Is the expression "Keep one eye on A and keep another on B" idiomatic?

    For example, A = your research of science, B = your own health.

    If you are a scientist, then:

    Keep one eye on science, keep another on your health.

    Is it idiomatic?
     
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    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Is it idiomatic?
    I'd normally expect: Keep one eye on A and another on B.

    A structure may sound natural if you're looking at in general idiomatic but that doesn't mean it'll always work when you actually apply it.

    I don't think it works in your example.
     
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