keep somebody abreast with

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usefulmonkey

New Member
Chinese
I know we can say "we must keep abreast with something"
Can I say something keep me abreast with something?
e.g. The literature surveys kept me abreast with the recent research trends
 
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  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In general, it's not a construction which always works very well in the passive voice. If you want to try giving us a few sample sentences with "sth" (which you should really write in full as "something", by the way ;)) replaced by actual words, we should hopefully be able to give you a bit more help.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, usefulmonkey, and welcome to the forum.

    I understand your sentence, but it sounds pretty strange to me. I'd use this version if I were trying to express that idea: The literature surveys keep me informed about recent research trends. Or: The literature surveys keep me up to date with recent research trends.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If you want to use "keep me abreast," the usual preposition is "of:" "Reading Computerworld keeps me abreast of developments in computing."

    I agree with DonnyB about abbreviations such as "sth." Some dictionaries, especially those published in China, use them to save space. Native speakers never use them, even in text messages and Internet chat rooms.

    And welcome to WRF!
     

    usefulmonkey

    New Member
    Chinese
    Thanks all for your responses. I did not realize the "sth" problem until just now!
    and I will use Egmont's suggestion in my essay.
     
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