keep your head above the water

MrToday

Member
English - England
Hi there,
I'm wondering if anyone knows how the Portuguese-speaking world would say:

"You have to work hard to keep your head above the water"

?

Many thanks
 
  • white_ray

    Senior Member
    Portuguese PT
    Hi MrToday,
    What do you think of:

    - “manter a cabeça fora de agua?” (out of the water?)
    - “manter a cabeça acima do nivel da agua”? (above the water level?)


    Hope this helps! :)
    wr
     

    MrToday

    Member
    English - England
    I wonder if you can be this literal.??

    I do apologise, you are PORTUGUESE -- I take it back..

    Thank you for your 3 replies!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    white_ray

    Senior Member
    Portuguese PT
    I wonder if you can be this literal.??
    The pleasure was mine! :)
    I am Portuguese, yes.
    By "this literal" you meant "word per word" (when possible)? :) I would need to picture the exact position of the head...
    “above the water” = "acima da agua"
    wr
     

    wtrmute

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Brazilian)
    Hello; yes, the Portuguese can be a bit literal-minded :D

    That being said, I think one could translate the sentence as
    "Você tem que trabalhar muito pra se manter no azul."

    Where "estar no azul" stands in opposition to "estar no vermelho" (quite literally being in the red; I believe that expression is used in that sense in English, as well). Alternatively, you could invert the sentence:
    "Você tem que trabalhar muito pra não entrar no vermelho."

    I hope that helps...;)
     

    white_ray

    Senior Member
    Portuguese PT
    I see, a little context would have helped, hehe :p
    In this case I would suggest:
    “Tens de trabalhar muito para conseguires sobreviver.” (to be able to survive)
    wr
     
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