Keep your pantyhose on !

JiPiJou

Senior Member
French
Dans le film "Abyss" de James Cameron, le héros, Virgil Brigman, dit, à deux reprises, à son épouse (dont il est temporairement séparé) : "Keep your pantyhose on !"

La version française du film n'aide guère en traduisant par "Garde ta petite culotte" !!! * Or, il ne semble pas que cette exclamation, qu'on trouve assez souvent sur Internet, ait la moindre connotation sexuelle. Par exemple, sur un site de jeux vidéo : « Anyway, I'm sure you can't wait to hear about those suit upgrades, but keep your pantyhose on, we're here to share everything with you. » ou « Other favorite links are still coming, so keep your pantyhose on ! » ou, au sujet de la côte italienne : «This might not sound like an appealing vacation spot, but keep your pantyhose on because this city will give you a whole new definition of "Riviera."»

Quelle est sa signification exacte ? Quelque chose comme "Ne vous découragez pas" ou "Ne soyez pas impatient" ? Y a-t-il des synonymes ? Ce n'est pas très clair.

Ets-ce très familier, vulgaire, argotique ou simplement humoristique ?

Merci.

* Mais il faut se méfier des traductions de ce film car, lorsque le héros, équipé d'un scaphandre révolutionnaire, met le pied sur le fond d'une fosse sous-marine et envoie, fort logiquement, le message « Touchdown », la traduction qui apparaît est « Essai » (le "touchdown" du rugby) !
 
  • helene james

    Senior Member
    français
    Vous emballez pas! Il y a une connotation sexuelle, mais humoristique et évacuée par l'emploi fréquent de l'expression, je pense.
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    The more common phrase is "Keep your pants on!" un peu de patience! This itself is a variation on "Keep your shirt on!"

    By using 'pantyhose' in place of 'pants' you are calling attention to the fact that you are addressing a female, in a rather insulting fashion.
     

    JiPiJou

    Senior Member
    French
    That is interesting. So, the evolution seems to have been : shirt > pants > panties (?) > pantyhose.

    I had been wondering whether there was a hidden meaning (as mgarizona seems to imply) in using "pantyhose". And why not the more elegant "panties / knickers"... or is that notion very subjective ? :eek:
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Yes, "Keep your panties on" is another common variant.

    FYI: The oldest form "Keep your shirt on" is related to another expression which has fallen out of use: "To get one's shirt out." The central idea is that someone has one upset and "itching for a fight." To prepare for a fight, of course a gentleman had to remove his shirt. "To get one's shirt out" means it prompts someone to 'untuck' his shirt, in preparation for removing it altogether.

    So originally there was a sense of "calm yourself" in these expressions which remains though the main idea is "be patient."
     

    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    "Pantyhose" in USE is no more, and perhaps less, vulgar than "panties" or BE "knickers" (Don't get your knickers in a twist).

    However, while mgarizona is doubtless correct as to "keep your shirt on" and as to the demeaning switch to "pantyhose", I agree with those who say there is more than a dose of explicit sexuality in the expression, as well as the fundamental meaning of "be patient". It is a statement that the enjoyment will be equivalent to an orgasm if one waits (don't take your pantyhose off yet). The masculine equivalent is "You'll cream in your pants" when ...

     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I don't think there's necesarily a sexual reference at all. Keep your hair on is the commonest version, with don't get your knickers in a twist coming second. They both mean be patient, calm down.

    Never heard the pantyhose version before; it's obviously American because they're called tights in the UK, and I don't think anyone says keep your tights on, do they?
     

    JiPiJou

    Senior Member
    French
    Never heard the pantyhose version before; it's obviously American because they're called tights in the UK, and I don't think anyone says keep your tights on, do they?
    The quote I mentioned was from a James Cameron film, therefore American indeed. But doesn't the equivalent British excalamation "Keep your panties on" exist ?
     
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