German to English kennenlernen

Dictionary entry: kennenlernen

bearded

Senior Member
I find that the translation ''meet'' is ambiguous (you could meet/begegnen someone in the street without knowing them..). I suggest become acquainted with sb. as a translation of jmd kennenlernen.
Example:
Ich lernte diese Dame vor zwei Tagen kennen > I became acquainted with that lady two days ago.


mdn/[etw] kennenlernen Vt, sepa(zum ersten Mal treffen)meet vtr :thumbsdown:
 
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  • elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Die Übersetzung ist schon richtig. Man sagt tatsächlich „meet“ und nicht „become/get acquainted with“.

    „begegnen“ wäre z.B. „run into“.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Es geht hier um die Bedeutung „zum ersten Mal treffen“ (1b im Duden). „become/get acquainted with“ entspricht der Bedeutung 1a im Duden. In der Bedeutung „zum ersten Mal treffen“ sagt man im Englischen „meet“.

    Mir fällt im Moment kein Beispiel ein, in dem ich „begegnen“ mit „meet“ übersetzen würde, aber das spielt hier eigentlich keine Rolle. Abgesehen von seinen anderen Bedeutungen, ist „meet“ die richtige Übersetzung von „kennenlernen“ im Sinne von „zum ersten Mal treffen“.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    „become/get acquainted with“ entspricht der Bedeutung 1a im Duden.
    Warum schließt Du die Bedeutung 1b aus?

    (Beispiele von mir)
    I went for a walk, and on the sidewalk/pavement near my house I met a strange woman... (begegnete ich)
    When I first became/got acquainted with him (or: made his acquaintance), he was still a very young man (als ich ihn kennenlernte)

    Aus WR ''English definitions'' (Stichwort/entry 'meet') - example of use of ''become acquainted'':
    to become acquainted (with): [~ + object]I've never met your cousin. / [no object]"Yes, we've already met,'' she said

    It seems that, when I wrote that ''meet'' is ambiguous, I wasn't wrong after all. / 'meet' ist doch mehrdeutig.
     
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    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In English, if you want to say that you made somebody's acquaintance (1b), you say "I met them." You don't say "I became/got acquainted with them." So sagt man das halt. "I became/got acquainted with somebody" is used to mean that you actually got to know them (1a).

    Examples:

    Scenario 1:
    At a party, A introduces B to C. B and C exchange a few pleasantries and a bit of small talk for a few minutes, and then part ways and mingle with others at the party and don't engage with each other any further.
    B can say:
    I met C at the party.
    B would not say:
    I got/became acquainted with C at the party.

    Scenario 2:
    B and C happen to see each other at another party a week later. This time, they sit down together and speak for a whole hour and they get to know a lot of things about each other.
    B can say:
    I got/became acquainted with C at the party.
    although in everyday speech it's much more common to say
    I got to know C at the party.
    I went for a walk, and on the sidewalk/pavement near my house I met a strange woman... (begegnete ich)
    Nein, das geht nicht, at least in US English. "I met a strange woman" would mean that you actually made her acquaintance. If you just saw her there or bumped into her or whatever, you would not say "met" in US English.
    When I first became/got acquainted with him (or: made his acquaintance), he was still a very young man (als ich ihn kennenlernte)
    No, see above. If you are just talking about the very first time you made his acquaintance (whether or not you actually went on to get to know each other), you would not say "got/became acquainted with him." You would say "met."

    It's like there's two steps:

    1. make X's acquaintance / meet X
    2. become/get acquainted with X / get to know X

    In each case, the red version is a more formal version of the green version, but the meaning is the same. The expressions in 1 do not mean the same thing as the expressions in 2. 1 corresponds to 1b in the Duden, and 2 corresponds to 1a in the Duden. You seem to think that the red one under 2 means or can mean the same thing as 1; that's not the case.

    As for the examples from the WR dictionary, my guess is that they are using "become acquainted (with)" in a very literal sense as a way to indicate what meaning they are talking about. In actual speech, we would not say "become acquainted with" in this meaning.

    I've never met your cousin. ≠ I've never become acquainted with your cousin.
    Yes, we've already met. ≠ Yes, we've already become acquainted.
    It seems that, when I wrote that ''meet'' is ambiguous, I wasn't wrong after all. / 'meet' ist doch mehrdeutig.
    In what sense do you feel it's ambiguous (unless you've changed your mind)? Can you give an example sentence in which you think the meaning would be unclear (and there would be at least two possible readings)?

    In any case, "meet" is an absolutely correct and idiomatic translation of "kennenlernen" in the sense given in the first post.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Can you give an example sentence in which you think the meaning would be unclear (and there would be at least two possible readings)?
    I would say ''I met that lady two days ago'' (two meanings: I got to know her for the first time, and I encountered her, e.g. in a shop). But then of course you'll say that the 2nd meaning is wrong. There might be some GB/US differences on this.

    Now I of course accept and respect your native speaker's explanation.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    "I became/got acquainted with somebody" is used to mean that you actually got to know them (1a).
    Duden, kennenlernen 1 a
    [Erfahrungs]wissen, Kenntnis[se] erlangen in Bezug auf jemanden, etwas; mit etwas bekannt werden; durch unmittelbaren Kontakt wissen, wie etwas ist

    Scenario 1:
    I met C at the party.
    In diesem Fall würde ich nicht "kennenlernen" verwenden, sondern " jemandes Bekanntschaft machen".
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    In diesem Fall würde ich nicht "kennenlernen" verwenden, sondern " jemandes Bekanntschaft machen".
    Ich empfinde "jemandes Bekanntschaft machen" als gehoben und/oder veraltet. Spontan würde ich das nicht verwenden. "Kennenlernen" bedeutet für mich zunächst, dass ich mit dem Namen ein Gesicht verbinden kann. Bei "get to know" würde ich vielleicht sagen: "näher kennenlernen".

    Deshalb finde ich die im Wörterbuch angegebene Entsprechung angemessen.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Ich empfinde "jemandes Bekanntschaft machen" als gehoben
    Vielleicht wegen dem ;) Genitiv?

    Empfindest Du diese Höflichkeitsfloskel auch als gehoben?
    "Es hat mich gefreut, Ihre Bekanntschaft zu machen."
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Also ich würde wohl nie sagen "Ich habe Klaus' Bekanntschaft auf einer Party gemacht", sondern "Ich habe Klaus auf einer Party kennengelernt".
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Also ich würde wohl nie sagen "Ich habe Klaus' Bekanntschaft auf einer Party gemacht"
    Ich auch nicht (wegen Klaus' ;) ) , könnte mir aber sehr gut vorstellen "Auf der Party habe ich Peters Bekanntschaft gemacht."
    oder
    "Klaus X. ist auch hier/ auf der Party. Wenn du seine Bekanntschaft machen willst, kann ich dich ihm vorstellen."

    Aber natürlich ist
    "Ich habe Klaus auf einer Party kennengelernt".
    völlig in Ordnung. In diesem Kontext kommt wahrscheinlich niemand auf die Idee, dass Du damit "näher kennengelernt" meinst.
     
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