Kick arse

maracuchi

New Member
Spanish-Venezuela
Hi, I was just wondering if this phrase is said, like I've got a kick arse sense of humour, I think I heard it somewhere but I'not really sure.

Thanks for your help.

Cheers!
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Welcome to the forum

    The phrase is valid, but the expression is colloquial, bordering on the vulgar. Your post, however, needs a little work. Let's try:

    Hi. I was just wondering if this phrase is used: "...like I've got a kick arse sense of humour. I think I heard it somewhere but I'not really sure.

    (I don't know what function "like" is supposed to play, however. Some uncultured native English speakers can't seem to speak without inserting an unnecessary "like" into every sentence.)
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    You can find this adjective in the Urban Dictionary, with the spellings kick-ass, kickass (both AE) and kickarse (BE). I'd probably write it "kick-arse", myself.

    You could certainly say "I've got a kick-arse sense of humour."
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Okay, I don't use it myself, but I heard it in:

    1. An interview of an actor from the movie "The Holiday"
    --I can't believe I am actually paid to look at her closely everyday, and watching her ass-kicking acting.

    2. In the movie "In Good Company"
    --We have to start kicking some ass (asses?) here.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Nichec, kick-arse and kick-arse are used as adjectives, unlike your second example. I've seen the "ass-kicking" in your first example before, but I'm not sure that it's all that common.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Nichec, kick-arse and kick-arse are used as adjectives, unlike your second example. I've seen the "ass-kicking" in your first example before, but I'm not sure that it's all that common.

    I know. But I did hear them in the movie and in the interview......(I am sure, because I was shocked)

    Hehe, it's not the kind of usages I like or am familiar with, so.......:p

    Oh, I just noticed. Welcome to the forum, maracuchi! :)
    (where are your manners, bibliolept? :D:D:D)
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    2. In the movie "In Good Company"
    --We have to start kicking some ass :tick:(asses? :cross:) here.
    I haven't seen the movie, but this is a very common and idiomatic usage in American English.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "Some ass" is more common than "some asses" when used figuratively.
    On the other hand, if you were speaking to several people, you might say "We're going to kick your asses," referring either to a competition of some form or to a literal fight.
     

    maracuchi

    New Member
    Spanish-Venezuela
    Hi, I was just wondering if this phrase is used, like in: "I've got a kick-arse sense of humour", I think I heard it somewhere but I'm not really sure.

    Thanks everybody for your help, and thanks to sdgraham for the corrections.

    Cheerio! (^-^)
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    "Some ass" is more common than "some asses" when used figuratively.
    On the other hand, if you were speaking to several people, you might say "We're going to kick your asses," referring either to a competition of some form or to a literal fight.

    I see, thanks! :)

    So, just let me be sure (please bear with me :p)

    "Ass" is a countable noun, but when used figuratively, we don't count it (the asses, I mean), right? :confused: :D
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Hi, I was just wondering if this phrase is used, like in: "I've got a kick-arse sense of humour", I think I heard it somewhere but I'm not really sure.

    Thanks everybody for your help, and thanks to sdgraham for the corrections.

    Cheerio! (^-^)

    Hmmm.....I have never heard of it, but I think I would prefer "I've got an ass/arse-kicking sense of humour/humor" (but you know, you would sound a bit pretentious saying that......:p)

    Once again, welcome to the forum! :)
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I see, thanks! :)

    So, just let me be sure (please bear with me :p)

    "Ass" is a countable noun, but when used figuratively, we don't count it (the asses, I mean), right? :confused: :D


    That's a fair rule of thumb. If I were, for example, trying to get my teammates ready for a game, either of these would have the same meaning:
    "We're going to kick ass."
    "We're going to kick some ass."
    "We're going to kick their asses."

    Now I have to go wash out my mouth (and hands) with soap.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    That's a fair rule of thumb. If I were, for example, trying to get my teammates ready for a game, either of these would have the same meaning:
    "We're going to kick ass."
    "We're going to kick some ass."
    "We're going to kick their asses."

    Now I have to go wash out my mouth (and hands) with soap.

    :D:D:D

    Thanks for the effort! (silly little head taking a 90 degree bow)
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    "I've got an ass/arse-kicking sense of humour/humor"

    That may sound more logical, but the common adjective is "kick-arse/ass", meaning, simply, "excellent". :)

    Arse/ass-kicking, to me, means something different. Something that is "arse-kicking" is something that kicks arse, as in gets things moving, is challenging.

    Ass/arse kicking and kick-ass/arse, because of this, have quite different meanings.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    That may sound more logical, but the common adjective is "kick-arse/ass", meaning, simply, "excellent". :)

    Arse/ass-kicking, to me, means something different. Something that is "arse-kicking" is something that kicks arse, as in gets things moving, is challenging.

    Ass/arse kicking and kick-ass/arse, because of this, have quite different meanings.

    Ohoh, I see! :idea: (so much for these asses :p :D)

    Thanks for the kick-ass explanation! (though I would never use them, the asses, I mean :D)
     
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