Kick [meaning 'stop' / American slang]

< Previous | Next >

JerryLCC

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

I just learned an American slang, kick, which means to stop doing something.

So, could I say,

Please kick talking, you are so annoying.

Is the mood strong enough to express one's negative emotion?


Thank yous guys
 
  • MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    Hi,

    I just learned an American slang word, kick, which means to stop doing something.

    So, could I say,

    Please kick talking, you are so annoying.

    Is the mood strong enough to express one's negative emotion?


    Thank yous guys
    No. You can say I kicked the habit, like smoking for example. It usually means to stop a bad habit.
     

    JerryLCC

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No. You can say I kicked the habit, like smoking for example. It usually means to stop a bad habit.
    Hi, MarcB,

    But the sample sentence here said: It's very hard to kick smoking if you've done it your entire life because nicotine is addictive.

    So, I think "kick" = "stop"

    Could you give another example, if that sample sentence was correct?

    Thank you
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In my experience, 'kick' meaning 'stop' is used in a vary specific context. It is used when it is very difficult ot stop something, like an addiction (such as smoking) or breaking a habit. As I understand it, the underlying idea is that you are getting rid of something that is controlling you, and that takes an act of determined resistance, such as kicking represents.

    I wouldn't use 'kick' to instruct people so stop doing something annoying. I would only use 'kick' if I was telling them to take control of compulsive behavior -- such as an addiction -- or something that I thought was like an addiction.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    If that is what I had in mind, I would be more likely to say "Kick your habit of yakking", "kick your addiction to yammering", and so on.

    I mean, that is what I would be more likely to say if I were to speak like that at all.
     

    thegreathoo

    Senior Member
    Srpski
    There are phrases in english that use kick and do not mean "stop," such as kick the tires (inspect the goods), kick her to the curb (break up with her), kick off (start of a football game), kick in (contribute), kick back (relax), etc. So no, kick does not mean stop, it depends on the phrase.
     

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    OK, I see, but what about Kick you yacking?
    Here I would say quit your yakking. As far as I am concerned kick sounds odd here.
    There are phrases in english that use kick and do not mean "stop," such as kick the tires (inspect the goods), kick her to the curb (break up with her), kick off (start of a football game), kick in (contribute), kick back (relax), etc. So no, kick does not mean stop, it depends on the phrase.
    These are other uses of kick,as you know words can have multiple meanings. So kick does mean stop but in the context of a bad habit.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top