Kick off or kick away

Super Saiyan

Senior Member
Cantonese
Hi, I have a question, which one would you use? ‘My daughter kicks away or off the blanket when she sleeps.” Do they mean different things?

I also read some posts about run away and run off. Run away has a sense of running away from a dangerous situation

Drive away and drive off, drive away has a sense of driving away while being chased.

So kick away and kick off should mean differently right? Thanks
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    ‘My daughter kicks away or off the blanket when she sleeps.”
    I'd use "kick off" here, though "kick away" would be understandable too. The main purpose of the kicking motion is to get the blanket off her body, so "kick off" sounds more natural in my opinion.
    drive away has a sense of driving away while being chased.
    No, not necessarily. I agree "run away" usually refers to running away to get away from something, whether a dangerous situation or merely something not wanted. But "drive away" doesn't have that same connotation.
    So kick away and kick off should mean differently right?
    Not always.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    So kick away and kick off should mean differently right?
    Kick(ed) off the blankets is idiomatic, not kick away.

    I also read some posts about run away and run off. Run away has a sense of running away from a dangerous situation
    Children run away from home, and lovers run off with each other. Run from danger is simpler than run away from danger.
    Drive away and drive off, drive away has a sense of driving away while being chased.
    No, they both mean the same thing and has nothing to do with being chased.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I also read some posts about run away and run off. Run away has a sense of running away from a dangerous situation

    Drive away and drive off, drive away has a sense of driving away while being chased.
    Not quite.
    Consider this: "I opened the back door so my dog could go pee, but he ran off/away." :D
    [cross-posted]
     

    Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Kick(ed) off the blankets is idiomatic, not kick away.


    Children run away from home, and lovers run off with each other. Run from danger is simpler than run away from danger.

    No, they both mean the same thing and has nothing to do with being chased.
    Thanks for your reply. I didnt write it clearly. Drive away can be used like the police chasd the criminals and the criminals got on a car and drove away. In this situation, it’s better to use drive away instead of drive off? Thanks
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    Thanks for your reply. I didnt write it clearly. Drive away can be used like the police chasd the criminals and the criminals got on a car and drove away. In this situation, it’s better to use drive away instead of drive off? Thanks
    It isn't that you are not explaining yourself well. It is just that English is a very flexible language and it is hard for a native speaker to understand your need to find a distinction in the usage of drive away and drive off. Like sdgraham said, it is possible to adapt any context to fit any scenario. It's hard for us to conceive of a difference in application between drive away and drive off since they are virtually synonymous, especially in the context you gave.
     
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