Kidney Pudding

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weristich

Senior Member
US and English
I was wondering how you would translated kidney pudding. I have pudding de rognon, but I don't know that it is right. i have never had this before, since I am American, so i am not exactly sure what i am talking about.
 
  • joleen

    Senior Member
    french / france
    Tartelettes aux rognons??

    Au passage, j'ai trouve deux belles citations :D :

    “Si les Anglais peuvent survivre à leur cuisine, ils peuvent survivre à n’importe quoi!”
    George Bernard Shaw​
    “La cuisine Anglaise, si c’est chaud c’est de la soupe, si c’est froid, c’est de la bière”
    Claude Gagnière​
     

    joleen

    Senior Member
    french / france
    I have other translations for it but I don't know which would fit or if it is accurate enough:

    Feuilleté aux rognons
    Croustade aux rognons
    Friand de rognons

    Tourte aux rognons is good as well.
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Assuming this, like steak and kidney pudding, is made with suet, I don't think that any of the above would work - they sound too crisp and pastry-ish to me.
     

    joleen

    Senior Member
    french / france
    I don't know, when I look at the images from google (typing "kidney pudding"), it seems like it is pastry-based
     

    FAC13

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I don't know, when I look at the images from google (typing "kidney pudding"), it seems like it is pastry-based
    Yes it is. Suet pastry if you know what that is. Would "pudding aux rognons" be understood - that is what my Collins-Robert suggests?
     

    pieanne

    Senior Member
    Belgium/French
    "Pudding" is typically UK.
    We don't have any word in French - were it Belgian or French - that corresponds to it.
    I think in that case it's better to keep "pudding".
     

    pieanne

    Senior Member
    Belgium/French
    If I can rely on the recipes I've googled, "blancmange" is made with
    gelatin(e).
    "Pudding" is made with flour (or something like that).
    When we say "pudding" in French, we mean "custard", I think...
     

    Juna Frato

    Senior Member
    Dutch, living in France
    Hi all,
    It would be a mistake to try to translate directly.

    Steak & kidney pie, chicken mushroom pie, etc have no equivalent in the French cuisine. Let alone the typical consistency of the specific pastries.
    It's the same as translating 'croissant' simply as a breadroll. There's simply more to it than that.
    So, if an equivalent WOULD exist, what could it best be called?
    Unfortunately, as there's savoury pies made of different kinds of pastry, it gets more and more complicated, lol.

    Basically:
    'Tartelette' describes both firm and fragile pastries (NOT identical to traditional English pastries) from which the top is open; the content of the pie is visible.
    'Tourte' describes both firm and fragile pastries from which the top is covered by more pastry; you cannot see the inside of the pie.
    'Feilleté" is more the kind of pastry used. Although, it IS also used as a word for 'pie' itself.
    Since I've seen steak & kidney pies both opened and closed, both translations are possible. It all comes down to what the pie looks like.

    ... Be ready to be surprised!!
    So it started all with kidney pudding. Pudding or, a 'pud', is a typical English term, mostly interpreted as pie.

    A pudding originally is ""a kind of sausage: the stomach or one of the entrails of a pig, sheep, etc., stuffed with minced meat, suet, seasoning, boiled and kept till needed,"

    As to the origin of the word, it's most likely from:
    -pud- "to swell" (early west germanic, as modern English stems from it)
    An entrail filled with minced meat, etc WOULD swell, wouldn't it? Not to mention smell........
    By the way, the way of storing food in entrails is called 'pudde' in German and 'boudin' in French (originally).

    Between English-speakers, the confusion lies here: the term 'pudding' is nowadays mostly used (outside England) as a sweet dish. Such as custard pudding, for instance.
    The problem with english is that it is such a common language, we forget there's a lot of difference between the different 'versions' of it and the 'original'.

    A long story, I know....
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Yes, but we're not talking about pies here, but puddings. And while you're right about 'pudding' being used for various sausage-y type things, that's only a distration here. A kidney pudding, with or without steak, traditionally involves encasing the meat in suet and steaming it for ages, which is why I objected to all the pastry/cooked in oven terms.
     

    Juna Frato

    Senior Member
    Dutch, living in France
    I would imagine it logical that entrails were simply replaced by pastries eventually. Cooking food evolved... although in some countries more than others, lol....
    Hence, pies ARE puddings (made of pastry). However, a 'Yorkshire pud' has absolutely nothing to do with a sausage at all. It's become such a common word, that all various kinds of meanings, interpretation etc are mixed up.
     

    joleen

    Senior Member
    french / france
    Here, I would just say that the way we use words surpasses what words were or are. What I want to say is that I'd rather go for a translation that seems natural in the target language than for a translation that is spot on (dictionnary, etymology etc...).
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Entrails?! Who's talking about entrails? :confused:

    And joleen, I might agree with you to some extent. But OTOH, in this country at least people are becoming ever more concerned about what is going into their food, and a translation that simply implies pastry rather than suet would not go down well with vegetarians (I believe there are a few of those in France, LOL), so I don't think we can totally abandon correctness.
     

    joleen

    Senior Member
    french / france
    I agree, and it depends of the context. Who is the public? Who is it translated for? etc etc

    I just had a look on a french cooking recipes website and searched "pudding". All the recipes that came up were desserts/sweet...
     

    weristich

    Senior Member
    US and English
    Wow, thanks for all of your help. I just felt like translating a paragraph for fun and the sentence was

    They went to a pub and ate steak and kidney pudding.


    In regards to pudding originally being made out of entrails, why yes that is correct. It actually tastes really good.
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Yuck. I suppose they exist in black pudding (if I wasn't already put off, I am now!), but fortunately neither steak, kidney or suet are entrails. Anyway, now we've established that it's steak and kidney pudding we're talking about that might make it a little easier for you to work out whether there's a French term for it.
     
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