kill cockroach

ADMP

Senior Member
Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
Can we use trample in this context?

" I have seen some people they kill insects (cockroach etc..) by using their foot & stepping on it."

Can you please show me the correct & the common way of telling this without changing the idea?
 
  • jabogitlu

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    I have seen some people kill insects (cockroaches, etc.) by stepping on them.

    There's really no need to use foot, because the verb "to step" implies you're using your foot.

    Also, you shouldn't use "they" here, because it sets up a second subject, making the sentence grammatically incorrect; technically, it's a run-on.

    Also, you must use "them" instead of "it" at the end, because it should agree with your subject, insects. Insect=it, insects=them.

    As for trample... not really, unless you're trying to use it figuratively. Like... "I see people killing these helpless insects, trampling all over them..."

    I hope to have helped you!
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    Many thanks jabogitlu for your assistance.

    If I wan to give an order to somebody to kill the cockroach using foot & without saying " kill the cockroach" how can say it.
    * setp on the cockroach ( is this correct? )
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    I have seen some people kill insects (cockroaches, etc.) by stepping on them.

    As for trample... not really, unless you're trying to use it figuratively. Like... "I see people killing these helpless insects, trampling all over them..."

    Can we use " trample the cockroach" as well instead of saying " stamp/step on the cockroach"?
     

    pharabus

    Member
    English
    I think the problem for me in using trample is that it implies the action is almost accidental, you deliberately step on something but you accidentally trample. Not sure if this is 100% correct but it is certainly the impression i get.

    P
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    I think the problem for me in using trample is that it implies the action is almost accidental, you deliberately step on something but you accidentally trample. Not sure if this is 100% correct but it is certainly the impression i get.

    P
    Many thanks for your reply. I am sorry, but I didn't get it.
     

    Trapezium

    Member
    UK, English
    I think the problem for me in using trample is that it implies the action is almost accidental, you deliberately step on something but you accidentally trample. Not sure if this is 100% correct but it is certainly the impression i get.
    I see it differently.

    "Step on" and "tread on" could both be accidental, because they're part of walking. Context could make it clear they were deliberate.

    "Stamp on" is definitely deliberate, and forceful.

    "Trample on" is repeated and forceful, and implies that the trampler is almost unaware of the thing being trampled.

    "You trampled all over my painting!"
    "Sorry, I didn't see it. Why did you leave on the floor?"
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    I see it differently.

    "Trample on" is repeated and forceful, and implies that the trampler is almost unaware of the thing being trampled.

    "You trampled all over my painting!"
    "Sorry, I didn't see it. Why did you leave on the floor?"
    As discussed in previous thread, trample can be used if you step on something forcefully and distroy it. Therefore can we use teample in this context
    "You trampled all over my painting!"
    "Sorry, I didn't see it. Why did you leave on the floor?"[/quote

    I think it's ok to use trample for cockroaches since we step on them having an idea to kill them. Is it acceptable?
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    As discussed in previous thread, trample can be used if you step on something forcefully and distroy it. Therefore can we use teample in this context
    "You trampled all over my painting!"
    "Sorry, I didn't see it. Why did you leave on the floor?"[/quote
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    As discussed in previous thread, trample can be used if you step on something forcefully and distroy it. Therefore can we use teample in this context
    "You trampled all over my painting!"
    "Sorry, I didn't see it. Why did you leave on the floor?"[/quote
    Is it ok to use trample as mentioned above
     

    Tenthplanet

    New Member
    KYJG6A
    Definition of TRAMPLE

    intransitive verb

    1: to tread heavily so as to bruise, crush, or injure


    2: to inflict injury or destruction especially contemptuously or ruthlessly —usually used with on, over, or upon <trampling on the rights of others>

    So in this particular instance, yes use may TRAMPLE a cockroach all you want
     
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