killing a ledge

Rixster

New Member
Italian
Hi all,

I'm translating a skateboarding video in Italian and at some point, a skater says about another one, "...he looked like he was going to kill that ledge!", and in all my research I see this "killing a ledge" term repeated quite a bit, but I don't seem to find the meaning of it. What is it? "Skip the ledge"? "Fall from the ledge"? I can't figure it out... 😢 Help, please.
 
  • Rixster

    New Member
    Italian
    Con un po' di fantasia si può intuire cosa significhi "kill" in questo contesto

    kill the lights
    kill the punch line

    Cosa credi voglia dire?
    Se fosse così semplice, non avrei scritto un post. Skaters hanno un gergo tutto loro e sono molto seri a riguardo. Preferisco di gran lunga sentire il parere di qualcuno che se ne intende, se possibile, invece che tirare a indovinare.

    Grazie del contributo, comunque.
     

    Rixster

    New Member
    Italian
    Ciao,
    ho spulciato dizionari sul gergo degli skater, ma "kill" non l'ho trovato. Però so che "to kill it" significa "fare qualcosa estremamente bene". Quindi penso che il senso sia che quel muretto / ostacolo (vedi qui: Obstacle Guide - What is a curb or ledge? | skatedeluxe Blog ) stava per essere superato perfettamente.
    Ciao, :)
    Ero propensa a pensare la stessa cosa, però dalla ricerca mi è sembrato che lo usassero come cosa particolare, quasi come il nome di un trick e - se lo fosse - non sono riuscita a capire a quale tipo di movimento si riferisse, perché tutti quelli a cui ho pensato hanno un altro nome, e sempre very specifico e particolare.

    Forse sono solo diventata paranoica io con tutti questi termini nuovi e significa semplicemente quello. 🤯 Speravo che Tony Hawk spuntasse e me lo confermasse, non lo so...😜

    Grazie mille anche a te per il contributo!!

    Ho realizzato che non ho dato abbastanza background info. Senza andare troppo nei particolari grazie ai benedetti NDA, il contesto in cui la frase è stata detta dallo skater A era che stava descrivendo il trick che skater B aveva fatto su un video, dal quale skater A aveva preso grande ispirazione, descrivendolo il suo trick preferito di skater B.

    Ora, skater A, nel descriverlo come suo trick preferito di skater B, ha detto: "Here he is, rolling towards that hub, and he looked like he was going to kill that ledge!" E non dice altro, quindi in questa frase è contenuta la descrizione del trick favorito di skater A fatto da skater B, non so se mi spiego.

    Ora, se dice "he looked like it" significa che Skater B non l'ha fatto, giusto? Quindi, se "killing the ledge" anche in questo caso significava che "l'ha fatto estremamente bene" - che poi bisognerebbe capire cosa, perché ci sono un bel po' di trick che si possono fare su un ledge - e skater B "looked like it", allora significa che "non l'ha fatto particolarmente bene", quindi come potrebbe essere il trick favorito di skater A? Capite come non ha senso in questo specifico contesto?
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Forse sono solo diventata paranoica io con tutti questi termini nuovi e significa semplicemente quello. 🤯 Speravo che Tony Hawk spuntasse e me lo confermasse, non lo so...😜
    I texted a friend with an 18-yr-old skateboarding daughter: she says she's never heard the term "to kill it" with any other meaning than "to do it well, to nail it."

    But reading your most recent message, I see your problem: you'd normally say "he looked like he was going to...." in front of something that "he" then doesn't do. You don't happen to have access to the video of Skater B that Skater A is describing, do you, so we can see what B is actually doing?

    Edit: perhaps it means that B looked like he was going to perform one trick (on a ledge) but then unexpectedly performed a different trick (on a hub)? :confused:
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    I think @Mary49 and @theartichoke's skateboarding friend have it right. To me, "to kill it" in the skateboarding world means to perform something very well. I believe one of the tricks is to jump and put the base of the board along the top of a wall and slide along it. To "kill the ledge" would be to slide along for a long distance and maintain one's balance and form.

    Here is a link to see some ledge tricks for skateboarding.

    Phil
     
    "To kill it" means to succeed or to do something extremely well, not only in the skateboarding world but more generally.
    Sembrava che stesse per affrontare quella sporgenza con grande tecnica e abilità.
    "To kill it" and "to smash it" and "to nail it" mean just about the same thing in this context.
     
    Last edited:

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    What do you guys make of the context, though? If I've understood it correctly, A is watching and describing a great trick performed by B, and says the following: "Here he is, rolling towards that hub, and he looked like he was going to kill that ledge!" On one hand, "he looked like he was going to..." sounds like A is describing something that B didn't actually pull off; on the other, everything about the context implies that B pulls off exactly what he's trying to pull off, namely A's favourite trick.

    It just occurred to me that A might be taking the "kill it" expression and "literalizing" it, so to speak, for extra effect: put a slang literally in there, imagine the voice of a stereotypical skater dude type, and you've got "Here he is, rolling towards that hub, and he looked like he was going to literally kill that ledge!" In which case, he's pulled the trick off, and did it so well that he didn't just kill that ledge, he looked like he was literally gonna kill it, dude! :D
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    I think you may be right, @theartichoke, about the additional information. Perhaps skater A is describing a particular trick using a ledge that skater B is attempting. Skater A likes the form, speed, and approach and says, "...it looked like he was going to kill that ledge." You are correct that the implication is that Skater B just didn't manage to execute it well, i.e., killing it.

    I don't think the second part of your interpretation quite fits. It might just be a bridge too far! I think your first idea was correct. Skater B looked like he was going to kill it but he just didn't pull it off.

    Phil
     

    Rixster

    New Member
    Italian
    Thank you all for all your input. And thank you theartichoke for texting your friend, too. You are really a great community. 😍

    It seems that we are in agreement that "killing it" means performing it well. The context in which it was said still confuses the heck out of me though. If Skater B didn't pull it off, why would that be Skater A favorite trick? And that's the entire sentence, so there is nothing else to pull extra info from. Maybe theartichoke is right and he is "literalizing" it, so to speak.

    I still have a few days before delivery. I'll keep thinking about it and try to figure out a translation that makes sense and won't offend any skater dudes... 🤙

    Thank you all again for everything!!💖

    I texted a friend with an 18-yr-old skateboarding daughter: she says she's never heard the term "to kill it" with any other meaning than "to do it well, to nail it."

    But reading your most recent message, I see your problem: you'd normally say "he looked like he was going to...." in front of something that "he" then doesn't do. You don't happen to have access to the video of Skater B that Skater A is describing, do you, so we can see what B is actually doing?

    Edit: perhaps it means that B looked like he was going to perform one trick (on a ledge) but then unexpectedly performed a different trick (on a hub)? :confused:
    I do know which one is the video that Skater A is referring to, but I don't think I can share it always because of the NDA, and trust me, the client takes the NDA as seriously as he should. I can tell you that skater B does roll up to an extremely short flight of stairs (4, maybe 5 steps top) and grinds the railing, that might have been maybe a meter long. I mean, it is a cool trick, I have no idea how can someone pull that off without "literally" killing himself, but he does pull it off. While I am not 100% sure that the current video shows exactly the video-part that skater A is talking about, it does look like it, because it's an extremely hard trick, or at least it seems very hard to perform to me, that the most athletic thing I do all day is get up from this chair and make more coffee.
     
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