Kim <resign?> <has resigned?>

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loviii

Senior Member
Russian
Greetings!

As I understood, "accusative + bare infinitive" is a possible variant of a construction called "polar echo".
The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, page 890:
A: Kim has resigned.
B: Kim resign?

To ascertain what it means, I've tried to think up some context:
A: Have you heard Kim has resigned.
B (with surprise):
(1) Kim resign?
(2) Kim has resigned?

What's the difference between (1) and (2)?

Thanks!
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, I agree. It doesn’t seem a very typical use of the construction, if Kim has already resigned.

    I hear Kim’s thinking of resigning.
    Kim? Resign? Never!
    I hear Kim has resigned.
    Kim has resigned? I’m amazed.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, I agree. It doesn’t seem a very typical use of the construction, if Kim has already resigned.

    I hear Kim’s thinking of resigning.
    Kim? Resign? Never!
    I hear Kim has resigned.
    Kim has resigned? I’m amazed.
    :thumbsup:
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    They don't seem to have the right punctuation.

    Her? A genius?

    That is what I would expect.
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The last one on this topic. Could you please take a look:
    Kim tell a lie! Surely not.

    I don't understand what it means and why there is an exclamative mark instead of a question mark as it was in the previous examples.

    Thanks!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    That one is different again, and you haven’t said what it’s in response to. It doesn’t quite ring true to me, although the construction itself is fine, as is using an exclamation mark (to indicate amazement) rather than a question mark.

    Apparently Kim was lying when she said she’d been fired.
    Kim? Lie? Surely not!
    She was lying? That’s not like her at all!
     
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