Kindly grant me leave for two days

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Roymalika

Senior Member
Punjabi
An application to the school principal requesting him for two days leave to attend marriage ceremony of your brother.

"Sir, the marriage ceremony of my younger brother is going to take place on 20 January. I will not be able to come to school. Kindly grant me leave for two days. I shall be very thankful to you."


Can I ask - is the underlined part idiomatic?
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I don't see much difference between "leave for two days" and "a two-day leave." If one or the other is how it's commonly referred to within your school system, that's the one I would choose.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I find the entire situation doubly bizarre.

    (1) A formal request to a principal for permission to be absent from school would come from the schoolchild's parent or guardian, not from the child himself/herself.
    (2) The younger brother of a schoolchild is ipso facto also a schoolchild. Isn't he a bit young to be getting married? Or would I, if I were 16 and had two brothers aged 22 and 25, refer to the 22-year old as "my younger brother"? I'd generally expect "my younger brother" to mean someone younger than me.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Is the letter being written by a teacher or by a student? That could make a difference.

    I was about to assume it's by a teacher as it's very unlikely a schoolboy would have a younger brother who's getting married. But the "I won't be able to come to school" bit sounds like it's a student who's writing it.

    Cross-posted.
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    I made a mistake in the OP. :( I meant to write "elder" instead of "younger". That caused confusion. I am very sorry for that.

    And the letter has been written by a student.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is not appropriate to first say you cannot attend school, and then ask for permission.

    If you are asking for permission, it's possible it will be refused.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    An employee might ask for "leave". Perhaps "leave of absence" would be more appropriate (but I agree that it should be the parent or guardian who is requesting this for their child).
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I believe the word "leave" used to refer to days off is considered old-fashioned now in the UK. I don't think Americans use it much, if at all. ("Leave" means "permission", so asking for two days' leave doesn't just mean asking for two days off. It refers to asking for permission to take two days off.) But it's still widely used in India and, I suppose, in Pakistan too. so I wouldn't call it unidiomatic if used in these countries.

    However I do find the words "Kindly grant me" overly formal. I'd have preferred something to the effect that the person wants to "apply" for leave.

    But it's unusual for a student/schoolboy to ask for leave. Leave is more usually associated with time off from work; it's something employees would ask their employers/superiors for.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Leave' might be used in the armed forces, but it's not commonly used in 'ordinary' situations.

    In your context, I think I'd say ' . . . two days off school'.

    Please can/may I have two days off school.
     
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