kinky, nappy (hair)

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by MarX, May 17, 2008.

  1. MarX Banned

    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Hello!

    Replying in another thread made me wonder if other languages have a specific name for the hair type typical of subsaharan Africans. I reckon in English it's called kinky or nappy.

    In Indonesian we have the word kribo or keribo.

    I don't know for sure what's the etymology of the word.
    In any case, there are native Indonesians who have such hair, although I don't think they have anything to do with black Africans (I might be wrong, though).

    We also have the word ikal to refer to a hair type somewhere between wavy and curly.

    Thanks!

    Salam,

    MarX
     
  2. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portuguese there is the noun carapinha for it.

    Yes, I believe the idea that this kind of hair is found in all Africans, and only in Africans, is a popular misconception.
     
  3. Joannes Senior Member

    Antwerp
    Belgian Dutch
    I was going to write kroezelhaar (the type of hair) and kroezelig (the adjective pertaining to it) for Dutch, but I looked them up in an online dictionary, and it turns out to be the case that people in the Netherlands rather say kroeshaar (and kroezig, I suppose)...
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2008
  4. blue_jewel

    blue_jewel Senior Member

    Philippines
    Filipino/Tagalog
    In Tagalog: its "kulot (wavy;curly) na buhok (hair). In our country, there are those we call Afro hair ;)
     
  5. Nanon

    Nanon Senior Member

    Entre Paris et Lisbonne
    français (France)
    French has "cheveux crépus", Spanish has "cabello crespo". In some Latin American (Caribbean) countries, "pelo malo" (i.e. "bad hair") is often heard (straight, "white" hair is preferred over nappy Afro hair).
     
  6. jazyk Senior Member

    Brno, Česká republika
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Brazil there's also crespo, pixaim and my grandmother also said pimenta-do-reino. :) There must be tons more, but I can't remember. I'd say that most or all of them are rather derogatory terms and should avoided (or so I think).
     
  7. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I wouldn't say that carapinha is derogatory in Portugal, though it is a word rarely used nowadays. I suppose it is best avoided, just to be on the safe side.
     
  8. MarX Banned

    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Thanks for the replies so far!


    To Portu speakers:
    How would you use the words you mentioned?
    They don't seem to be adjectives.
    Do you say something like:
    Ele tem uma carapinha
    ... um crespo
    ... um pixaim
    ... uma pimenta-do-reina

    ?

    Salam,


    MarX
     
  9. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Or "a carapinha dele", etc.

    There are also other expressions for frizzy hair.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2008
  10. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    In German this would be "krauses Haar" (which would be referring to hair just being so, no matter for what reason - if naturally so or if the hair stylist is responsible for it, due to some error he or she made, or also by purpose: the so-called Afro Look) or "Kraushaar" (in which case one would rather think that the cause is natural, or in the genes, but not necessarily so).

    Also there's the term "Locke" and "lockiges Haar", but this does not mean the specifical look of "krauses Haar". Further, a "Dauerwelle" is "lockiges Haar" due to treatment at the hair stylist's ("Dauerwelle" is not quite an Afro Look) - so no "krauses Haar" too, here.

    Yes, of course Europeans also can have "krauses Haar" (or whatever you call it in your language). The difference is that with Africans "krauses Haar" would be the norm while with Europeans (with no direct African ancestry, of course, except for the ancient one as all humans are descendants of African homo sapiens) it is the exception.

    The most popular "Kraushaar" person in German literature is the Struwwelpeter (by Wilhelm Busch).
    Nevertheless, even though the outcome of long European hair may be rather similar to African hair (Struwwelpeter certainly reminds one of Afro Look) this depends on hair type, and nevertheless 'technicaly' both hair types (African and European) are different (as is Asian hair, by the way).
     
  11. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    In Finnish we have two words quite close to each other but meaning different hair:

    kihara = curly hair
    kähärä = typical Afrirican hair, but also artificially frizzed hair

    (The Finnish words are adjectives.)
     
  12. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Are those terms for dreadlocks?
     
  13. MarX Banned

    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Krauses Haar = kinky/nappy hair
    Kraushaar = ~

    die Locke, -n = the curl, -s
    lockiges Haar = curly hair

    Dauerwelle = perm

    Dreadlocks stays the same, AFAIK.

    Salam,


    MarX
     
  14. kusurija

    kusurija Senior Member

    Lithuania, K. city
    Lithuania Czech
    In Czech:
    kudrnatý (curly [person, hair...])
    kudrny (curliness, curled - about hair)
    kudrnatost :confused: ((degree of) hair curliness)
     
  15. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    No, they aren't. (So MarX is right here.)
    Dreadlocks actually always would be called 'dreadlocks' in German - it really is impossible to get a dreadlock hair style at your stylists' with using any word from German origin: you might come out with any possible hair style but certainly not with dreadlocks.

    'Locke' and 'lockiges Haar' is curly hair (but not curly like 'krauses Haar' - African style, and certainly not dreadlocks).
    And 'Dauerwelle' is perm as already posted by MarX.
     
  16. Juri Senior Member

    Koper, near Trieste
    italian/Slovenia
    In Italian we say as Portu and Spanish "capelli crespi" ;with them are formed "treccine" little pigtails; such hairdressing is named "afro style" or acconciatura afro.
     
  17. Nizo Senior Member

    In Esperanto,

    kinky hair = krispaj haroj
    curly hair = buklaj haroj
    dreadlocks = dredlokoj
     
  18. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In MoGr the adj. is «σγουρός, -ρή, -ρό» [zɣuˈɾɔs] (masc.), [zɣuˈɾi] (fem.), [zɣuˈɾɔ] (neut.) of unknown etymology (possibly from the Byz. Gr. adj. «σβουρός» sbourós --> live wire, spinner < fem. «σβούρα» sboúra --> spinning top (onomatopoeic)).

    We commonly use the compound «σγουρομάλλης, -λλα, -λλο» [zɣu.ɾɔˈma.lis] (masc.), [zɣu.ɾɔˈma.la] (fem.), [zɣuˈɾɔ.ma.lɔ] (neut.) --> curly, of-curly-hair < «σγουρός» + «μαλλιά» [maˈʎa] (neut. nom. pl.) --> the hair on top of the head < Byz. Gr. «μαλλία» mallía (neut. nom. pl.) with synizesis < Classical masc. «μαλλός» măllós --> flock of wool (with obscure etymology).

    The noun is «σγουράδα» [zɣuˈɾa.ða] (fem.).
     

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