Kit yourself out in the right clobber

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seeeker

Senior Member
Please help me figure out the meaning of the phrase "Kit yourself out in the right clobber" in the following sentence from the description of the game "Duels Champions:

Kit yourself out in the right clobber for victory in Duels Champions. (Apple's App Store)

Thank you for your time.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think our dictionary places too much stress on the meaning as clothes.

    I prefer Cambridge for this:

    clobber
    noun [ U ]
    UK informal

    possessions, especially those that you carry around with you, or clothes:
    I've got far too much clobber in my handbag.

    Did you bring all your tennis clobber?

    The quote about tennis clobber is helpful here. It doesn't just mean just your tennis clothes, but the equipment, shoes, racquet, tennis balls, etc. too.

    In the OP it may be referring to specialist clothing, or other equipment too.
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    And I've never heard that meaning of clobber. I suspect it's BE, too.
     
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    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    It is. I've heard it quite often.

    I'm constantly surprised at the fact that many BE speakers on this forum seem familiar with American colloquial terms but not the other way round.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I'm constantly surprised at the fact that many BE speakers on this forum seem familiar with American colloquial terms but not the other way round.
    The Brits are spending too much time watching American TV and movies (or telly and films, if you prefer). :D Most of my knowledge of BE comes from reading, and I'm sure at least some of it is now out of date.

    I would have guessed this meaning for clobber was AuE.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    You're not confusing with cobber? Clobber was virtually unknown in Britain or America before 1950; in earlier times as a noun it meant cobbler's wax.

    It's far better known as a verb (= to attack, to beat) than a noun in the USA; in Britain both are equally common.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    In the OP it may be referring to specialist clothing, or other equipment too.
    I've always understood clobber to refer to clothing though. The OP also seems to refer to what you put on: ' Each piece of gear you own boosts your hero’s health or power. Helmet, armour and pants will keep you protected, while your weapon, shield, shoulders, gloves and boots add up to the force you can put into each blow. ' And if someone is naked, they are sans clobber.

    Kit is also often associated with clothes, though with possible accessories - as in 'PE kit', 'swimming kit'.
     
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