knee trembler (UK)

  • Monkey F B I

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Exactly what I thought it was :p

    This is also sort of present in at least one piece of American literature: For Whom the Bell Tolls talks about the knees and the earth trembling.

    It's also in Angela's Ashes (which isn't American), I believe.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...]

    It's also in Angela's Ashes (which isn't American), I believe.
    It's a bit hard to tell really.
    It was written by Frank McCourt who was born in Brooklyn, lived in Limerick (Ireland) between the ages of about four and nineteen, then went back to the US.
    The book is mostly, as I recall, about his time in Limerick.

    And yes, the term knee-trembler is familiar in Ireland too.
     

    Monkey F B I

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It's a bit hard to tell really.
    It was written by Frank McCourt who was born in Brooklyn, lived in Limerick (Ireland) between the ages of about four and nineteen, then went back to the US.
    The book is mostly, as I recall, about his time in Limerick.

    And yes, the term knee-trembler is familiar in Ireland too.
    I should have clarified, you're right. This is dangerously off-topic of me though...

    The use in that book was by McCourt's mother as she explained to him how she got herself into such a bad situation.

    So yes, it's definitely a recognized term in Ireland as well.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    As was gently pointed out by PM, although there is a link to the Urban Dictionary, none of the above contributors actually explained.

    A knee-trembler is a sexual encounter with both participants upright, one of them usually leaning against a wall.

    The Urban Dictionary version presumes that this happens close to a nightclub or bar and is typically brought to a premature close as a result of interruption or technical failure.

    That version is unduly prescriptive. Knee-tremblers have been known to occur in a much wider range of situations.
     

    Singinswtt11

    Senior Member
    English since birth, Spanish shortly thereafter
    Thanks guys! And to you, Pan, for explaining. I first read it in another thread as a synonym for "Wham, bam thank you ma'am." Not to be demanding... but can someone give me an example of a situation or dialogue or something? I mean would it be okay to say "Last night after the party I had a knee-trembler"?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Not that I have any direct personal experience of such things, don't you know, but I hear tell of them.
    From what I hear, you would be unlikely to have a knee-trembler after the party. Indeed, from what I hear of parties these days, there would be little need for this particularly uncomfortable (allegedly) modus operandi.
    You would perhaps hear that someone (some two people, of course) had nipped out for a quick knee-trembler between dessert and coffee - or possibly school-kids in the stationery cupboard.

    I don't think dialogue comes into it much.
     
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