knock/hit something down

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ADMP

Senior Member
Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
Hi everybody!!!!

How can we say this correctly?

There was a small boy & a girl. One day they went to a electrical lihgting shop with mammy. When mammy was selecting the the things the boy & the girl started playing around pushing each other. Then mammy got very angry & shouted at them telling " Stop pushing each other if he was pushed back, he would knock/hit something down & break & he'll get electrical shock"

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi everybody!!!!

    How can we say this correctly?

    There was a small boy & a and girl. One day they went to an electrical lighting shop with Mammy. When Mammy was selecting the things, the boy & the and girl started playing around, pushing each other. Then Mammy got very angry and shouted at them, telling saying "Stop pushing each other. If he was pushed backward, he would knock/hit something down and break it and he'll get an electrical shock"

    Thanks in advance.
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    Thanks Dimcl. Can you please explain me the difference between knock & hit in this context. Because I get confused most of the time with this.
    Thanks again.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks Dimcl. Can you please explain me the difference between knock & hit in this context. Because I get confused most of the time with this.
    Thanks again.
    Well, we don't use the phrase "hit down". "Hit" could be used in your sentence, ADMP, but then you would remove the word "down". I might say:

    "I had a car accident and hit the fence". This would only tell you that I hit the fence - you wouldn't know whether the fence is still standing or not.

    If I say:

    "I had a car accident and knocked down the fence", you'd know the status of the fence - it would be lying broken on the ground.

    When we're in a crowded shop, if you back up and "hit" something you are likely to "knock it down" (onto the floor where it will probably break) or "knock it over" (it just falls over but probably remains on the shelf without breaking).
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Thanks Dimcl. Can you please explain me the difference between knock & hit in this context. Because I get confused most of the time with this.
    Thanks again.
    One problem with your original post was that you used the ampersand (&) instead of the word and. The ampersand is rarely used in published writing, even when that writing represents informal speech. The only time it is regularly used in published writing is in the name of certain businesses such as Barnes & Noble.

    In short, if you habitually use the ampersand as a replacement for the word and in published work, including Internet forums such as this one (where posters are asked to use standard English), you will irritate people.
     
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