Knock, knock

  • Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Tatar:
    shak-shak, shaky-shaky, shyk-shyk, shalt-shalt, tuk-tuk, tyk-tyk, tok-tok

    Kazakh:
    tars-turs

    Ossetian:
    guypp-guypp, kuyrts-kuyrts

    Kirghiz:
    tak-tuk
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    In German it is

    "Klopf-klopf!" with the related verb "klopfen", or
    "Poch, poch!" with the related verb "pochen".

    Basically they mean the same with the following difference:

    "Pochen" is usually done with the ankle of the finger, seldom a tool is used. "Klopfen" is often be done with the ankle of the finger, but in many cases a tool is used. In tendency it is louder than "pochen".

    If a tool is used, it is usually named.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    In Dutch: klop-klop (from (?) kloppen, to knock). Maybe tok-tok, but that seems less common.

    Just wondering: are we and the Swedish the only ones in the world who have heard the noise begins with a double-consonant sound ? ;-)
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Tatar:
    shak-shak, shaky-shaky, shyk-shyk, shalt-shalt, tuk-tuk, tyk-tyk, tok-tok

    Kazakh:
    tars-turs

    Ossetian:
    guypp-guypp, kuyrts-kuyrts

    Kirghiz:
    tak-tuk
    Very interesting contribution, because Kazakh and Kirghiz seems to be the only languages that do not use exact reduplication. In Hungarian the not exact reduplication (i.e. not kopp-kopp, but kipp-kopp means something else).
     

    Wilma_Sweden

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Scania)
    In Dutch: klop-klop (from (?) kloppen, to knock). Maybe tok-tok, but that seems less common.

    Just wondering: are we and the Swedish the only ones in the world who have heard the noise begins with a double-consonant sound ? ;-)
    I would have though German klopf also counts? :) I have no idea what the other Scandinavians say. Feel free to post a thread in the Nordic forum.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    In Dutch: klop-klop (from (?) kloppen, to knock). Maybe tok-tok, but that seems less common.

    Just wondering: are we and the Swedish the only ones in the world who have heard the noise begins with a double-consonant sound ? ;-)
    As I wrote: The German language has "klopf-klopf!" which seems to be cognate at the first glance.

    English has "knock" where "k" became silent. Are there English dialects, where it is spoken?
     

    Wilma_Sweden

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Scania)
    English has "knock" where "k" became silent. Are there English dialects, where it is spoken?
    As far as I'm aware, no English ones that I know of, but some variants of Scots, according to Wikipedia. It is debatable whether Scots should be regarded as a dialect of English or a language of its own.
     
    Last edited:
    In Greek:
    Τακ-τακ (tak-tak)
    I apologize for quoting myself, I just wanted to add that τοκ-τοκ (tok-tok) is also common. The verb is «κτυπώ» or (colloquially) «χτυπώ» (kti'po or xti'po) from the ancient «κτυπέω», "ktū'peō" [uncontracted]/«κτυπῶ», "ktū'pō" [contracted], lit. "to ring or resound"
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    So you don't have reduplication, do you ? Or no, I have misunderstood: the first is the onomatopeia, the second is the verb.... Strange though that you use the 'ring' verb for expressing the 'knock-knock', or isn't it ?
     
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    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    In both Hindi and Urdu we use:

    كھٹ كھٹانا खट्खटाना khaT khaTaanaa

    I mentioned this here, post 33.

    An onomatopoetic word in Urdu: ism-e-Saut اسم صوت = the noun of sound!
     

    Pugnator

    Senior Member
    Neapoilitan (Naples) / Italian (Italy)
    [Moderator's Note: Merged with a previous thread]
    Hello, what's the onomatopoeia for knocking on your language ?
    In English it is "Knock Knock"
    In Italian is "Toc Toc"
    In Neapolitan is "Tuppe Tuppe"
    .
    The strange things is that in all the three languages the onomatopoeia is composed by 2 words, like most onomatopeia.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    DaylightDelight

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Tokyo
    Japanese:
    トントン(tong-tong) or コンコン(cong-cong) are common for light/usual knocks.
    ドンドン(dong-dong) may be used for heavy knocks.
     

    SuperXW

    Senior Member
    叩叩叩(koukoukou) in Chinese, note that there's usually three, not two.
    Maybe 叩叩叩(koukoukou) is common in Taiwan and some regions, but I personally don't know anyone who would use this (I lived in Beijing and Shenzhen majorly).
    Checking the question on baidu.com, which platform is used by most Mainland Chinese, I found none of the given answer was 叩叩叩(koukoukou).

    I and most Chinese I know usually use 咚咚咚(dong1dong1dong1).
     

    Ectab

    Senior Member
    Arabic-Iraq
    Arabic:
    دق دق duq-duq

    Iraqi Arabic dug-dug (we change q into g) and we would repeat it three times dug-dug-dug or dug-dug-doog
     
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