Knock over/off??

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sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!

Who knocked over/off this vase?

Do these prepositions have the same sense in the sample above? Is there a subtle difference between them?

Thanks in advance;

Sam:cool:
 
  • Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    Hello amigos!

    Who knocked over/off this vase?

    Do these prepositions have the same sense in the sample above? Is there a subtle difference between them?

    Thanks in advance;

    Sam:cool:
    No, "knocked over" would mean who has upset the vase.

    "Knocked off" would colloquially mean who has stolen the vase.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Some examples for "knock off"

    knock off
    1. Informal a. To take a break or rest from; stop: knocked off work at noon.
    b. To cease work: It's after five; let's knock off.

    2. Informal To complete, accomplish, or dispose of hastily or easily; finish: That author knocks off a book a year.
    3. Informal To get rid of; eliminate: knocked off 12 pounds in a month.
    4. Slang To kill or overcome.
    5. Slang To hold up or rob: knocked off a bank.
    6. Informal To copy or imitate, especially without permission: knocking off someone else's ideas.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You could say "Who knocked this vase off the table?" The vase is no longer on the table; it is probably on the floor and possibly broken.

    However, if you say simply "Who knocked off this vase?", the meaning is, as Joobs says above, "Who stole this vase?"
     
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