know <what date /which date / the date> you are coming.

skydown13

Senior Member
Mandarin
Please let me know what date you are coming.
Please let me know which date you are coming.
Please let me know the date you are coming.

Are they all correct?
 
  • nem44

    New Member
    French - France
    For the first sentence you can't say what is better if you say which ! But for the others it's ok.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    • Please let me know what date you are coming. :tick: Probably the most common.
    • Please let me know which date you are coming. :tick: Used when two or three dates have been mentioned, and a choice must be made between them.
    • Please let me know the date you are coming. ? Common but not very good style.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Please let me know the date you are coming. :tick: Perfectly normal, standard English, and "style" is a personal opinion. In this case, my opinion is that it is perfectly good style.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Are you chaps sure you wouldn't like to see "on" somewhere in each of the alternatives? They seem curiously naked without it.
    Either at the end, after "coming", for all three cases, or immediately after "know" for the first two, or "the date on which" for case 3.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Absolutely sure. I'd actually say "Please let me know when you are coming" but if for some reason I wanted to make it clear that I wanted the actual date (as opposed to an answer like "next Tuesday") I'd probably say "Please let me know the date you are coming."
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Indeed I'd also say "let me know when you are coming", or perhaps "let me know the date of your arrival".

    But I'm surprised that you don't think 'on' necessary. Do you consider it acceptable but optional, or downright undesirable/wrong?
    I would certainly expect it to be present in the answer:
    I am coming on the 29th.:tick: I am coming on March 1st.:tick: I am coming on 2nd (or on the 2nd of) April.:tick:
    I am coming the 29th:cross:. I am coming March 1st.:confused: I am coming 2nd April.:confused:


    I know I can't be totally wrong here, because, although one has to be careful how to interpret these results, Google Ngram Viewer shows "date on which you" to be some 30 times as common as "date which you", and Google Ngram Viewer gets no hits for "know the date which".
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I agree with Ed. I do believe 'on' would make things a lot better and I find it downright :D useful. Seriously, that was my first thought while reading the sentences in the OP, especially the second one. The first one makes me just a tad nervous with that 'what' but I can't lose sleep over it. :)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Other constructions, other usages...
    :thumbsup:
    "What day are you coming?" "I'm coming on Tuesday."
    "Please let me know the date you are coming" "I'm coming on the 29th of July."

    Like Keith, I see no need for "on" where I haven't used it.

    I wouldn't be at all surprised to hear "I'm coming July 29th", but I wouldn't say it.

    The ngrams you used don't address the thread topic, which includes "... which date you ...", not "... the date which ..."
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Hello,

    Would "let me know about the date that suits you" also be ok?
    If you just want them to tell you the date, then there's no reason to use "about," and doing so would sound odd, except in very informal conversation (in which case "that suits you" would sound odd). If you're trying to ask something else, please explain what it is.
     

    cointi

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you, Florentia52. I am setting up a meeting. I just want to ask them what date would suit them best. I had not suggested any particular date.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Would "let me know about the date that suits you" also be ok?
    I wouldn't personally use "about" there.

    To set up a meeting, I'd say something like:
    "Please let me know if you have a preferred date".
    Or perhaps:
    "Please suggest a date which would suit you." :)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I would definitely not use about, because it would suggest that I wanted the date to be described rather than identified.
    "Let me know about the results of the experiment" also sounds odd to me.
     
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